Welcome to Raja's Pretension Palace
  ...built for those in relentless search of eternal damnation

"And if you listen very hard the tune will come to you at last" - Led Zeppelin (from the song "Stairway To Heaven")

 

If I knew that I would be soon stranded on a beautiful remote island with lots of booze and food, what music albums would I pack? You know the kind that would keep me warm company while I construct that elusive escape boat with turtle skeleton, shark skin, whale bones and coconut shells!

The desert island collection idea was what got me started on this venture. It was also a good opportunity to have some fun trying out unheard music and discovering obsure gems. When I started on this thought about 3 years back, I woudn't have guessed that I would come up with something this massive. Initially it was top 10, then top 25, then top 50 and after sometime I thought I had settled on a top 100 for a while; until I realized that my top 100 is mostly made of few rock and electronic music acts that I know and I like. I wanted to branch out, listen to different genres and sub-genres, even the ones I did not like at that time and learn more about music in general. I could have stopped at 100 and obnoxiously written a page of reviews of my top 100 favorite albums and been a snob about how great that list is and how better it is than the rest of the world. But I chose not to be juvenile about it. I kept exploring and exploring; while deciding in the process that a list of 100 was not enough. I raised it to 250, then 300 and then eventually put a cap on it at 333. At one stage I had close to 700 albums lined up for the top 333. Then I did some pruning while continuing to listen to other genres like Western classical, Indian classical, other rock/pop/electronic music sub-genres (that I didn't care for initially), blues, folk and classical music from across the world, jazz and even genres like hip hop, reggae, and country which I do not like; until I was satisfied that I have explored all styles out there. I also decided I would only listen to albums recorded between 1950-2000 for this web page. I plan to have another page for music recorded before 1950 and yet another for music recorded after the year 2000. Those pages won't be have a set list like this page; albums will be added on an ad-hoc bassis as I "discover" masterpieces. Back to this list - the idea of having a start year and an end year for the list, eliminates the necessity for listening to brand new albums as they are releaseed and makes choosing and discarding albums for a list easier. Technically, I shoudn't be including the year 2000 as it makes it 51 years instead of the nice round figure of 50; but I like to cheat. To be honest, initially I was going to initially stop at year 1999 but then I realized that I like several albums recorded in the year 2000.

There is one problem with this approach of listening to all kinds of albums over a long period of 51 years. You cannot possibly listen to every piece of music recorded over those years. So you got to stop somewhere - preferably when you are confident that you have sampled enough of every music style out there - to have an informed opinion. I went through most styles of music from all across the world in as much depth, as I deemed necessary. It is possible that I have not sampled a certain styler deeper than I should have and I might have missed some deep buried treasures. But the same can be said of any music fan out there. There is no way for anyone to claim that they have heard every possible type of music recorded for that 51 year period. I certainly do not claim that. Nor do I claim that I have given equal focus to all the music genres and styles out there. If you like a certain style of music you tend to explore it deeper than just the most highly rated albums in that genre. You might still try to dvelve a bit further but if you encounter one lemon after another you are bound to stop; believing you just don't like that music style. I believe I have given every style out there its fair shake. So coming back to the problem with listening everything approach; I had a solution for that. I decided to put a deadline on finalizing the list. And the deadline was today - the very first day of writing this (rewritten from scratch) intro - the date being 7/7/2017. I have a liking to the number 7 (nothing religious about it; Iconsider myself an atheist.) Its just that I was born in 1977 and that year has two 7s in it). I also like the number 3. You will see a lot of counts adding up to 3 or 7 or repititions of 3 like 33, 333 or 7 like 77, 777 and so on. And thats one of the reasons I decided to do 333 masterpieces!

Before you read further, I must warn you. I have my biases. This list of 333 masterpieces is not objective by any means. I like the concept of listening to music than listening to songs. Though I do like melodic pop music, I tend to gravitate towards exploratory music. That does not mean I always go for the most technically challenging, intellectually stimulating or the most experimental music out there. There is nothing wrong with a well-written 2-3 minute pop song. In fact I believe in many cases writing a simple memorable song is much difficult that writing a complex and long composition. And composing an album full of memorable melodic short songs is probably the most difficult thing to do, anyway. So full respect for that. However, I notice that even in pop music, I tend to like songs which have good hooks, riffs, solos or instrumental melody rather than the songs in which the vocals and lyrics mean the most and the instrumentation is secondary, non-noticeable or just present for added flavor. Given a choice, I would choose songs with good instrumentationa and mediocre lyrics over songs with mediocre instrumentation and good lyrics. Although I do like great vocals very much, decent vocals do fine with me. But I really do not like bad vocals getting in the way of a good song. In fact majority of the albums on this list are entirely instrumental. So you can guess how much I care for lyrics and vocals.

After what I am going to say in this paragraph, many of you might want to stop right here. My favorite genre/subgenre of music are in this order - late 60s/early 70s psychedelic rock/art rock/hard rock -> 90s electronic music -> Indian classical -> so called World music ->Westerm classical -> Indian film music ->psychedelic folk -><insert any style here> in that order. There are exceptions to the rule in many cases. In fact, I tend to hate more passionately, music from the styles I love than the styles I don't care for. If I know a certain style well it makes sense that I would be even more opinionated on that style, doesn't it? I tend to hate middle of the road artists in every style. I prefer artists which go for the extremes. Hopefully that gives some idea on what kind of albums will not be on this page! If my taste in music offends you, you are welcome to jump ship right here, right now. You can always wait until you hear the first insult hurled at your favorite artist; but hopefully I have saved you some grief here by giving a clue on what this list is going to be lie.

Also let me warn you, I do not have the broadest minds out there when it comes to music. I am not going to sit there and pretend that I like everything in spite of having heard a lot of different styles of music. So just to make the list not too narrowly focussed on a select few artists, I decided to put a rule for myself. The golden requirement for me to pick an artist to have multiple albums on the list, is that the artist should have multiple masterpiece albums that sound significantly different from each other. Yep, two similar sounding masterpiece albums by the same artist do not get counted as two - I pick the better one and discard the other one. This rule resulted in only 12 artists having multiple albums. Yeah, just 12! And 300 different artists are represented here.

Before I start the countdown I must tell you three things - a) This page will not intended to give you a music history lesson and will not be further glorifying the so called greatest artists. The rankings do not determine who are the greatest or best artists are, between 1950-2000. Many of the highly ranked albums on this list are from acts literally unknown to most of the world, b) This is indeed a countdown and the list starts at #333 and works all the way upto #1. So reads this as if you are reading a book. Do not scroll all the way down! That would be like reading the last page of a whodunnit suspense novel, first and then reading the novel again from the beginning and c) I do not care how influential an album was. That means squat to me. In my opinion, if a certain album spawned a host of imitators, it might have been too trivial and might not have been that good to begin with. So, no cool points for being revolutionary or groundbreaking. That alone does not make it a masterpiece. So, lets define what a masterpiece is. In my simple definition a masterpiece is an album which achieves all the artistic goals it sets out for; while sounding good to *MY* ears and also sounding original at the same time. It need not be an epic and some kind of statement. It just has to be good and effective while being good. Thats it! It doesn't have to anything more complex than that. If you disagree with the definition, please LEAVE!!!

So now that you have read all the warning signs, lets move to the actual list...

133 ALBUM MASTERPIECES
MASTERPIECE #133 CLEARLIGHT SYMPHONY CLEARLIGHT
1
Clearlight Symphony - Part 1 (20:29)
2
Clearlight Symphony - Part 2 (20:35)
   
 
MASTERPIECE #132 MCMXC A.D. ENIGMA
1
Joy (18:13)
2
Lotus Feet (4:44)
3
What Need I Have For This (29:03)
 
 
MASTERPIECE #131 PET SOUNDS THE BEACH BOYS
1
Wouldn't It Be Nice (2:25)
2
You Still Believe In Me (2:31)
3
Thats Not Me (2:28)
4
Don't Talk (Put Your Head On Your Shoulder) (2:53)
5
I'm Waiting For The Day (3:05)
6
Let's Go For Away For Awhile (2:18)
7
Sloop John B (2:58)
8
God Only Knows (2:51)
9
I Know There's An Answer (3:09)
10
Here Today (2:54)
11
I Just Wasn't Made For These Times (3:12)
12
Pet Sounds (2:22)
13
Caroline, No (3:05)
 
MASTERPIECE #130 WHO'S NEXT THE WHO
1
Wouldn't It Be Nice (2:25)
2
You Still Believe In Me (2:31)
3
Thats Not Me (2:28)
4
Don't Talk (Put Your Head On Your Shoulder) (2:53)
5
I'm Waiting For The Day (3:05)
6
Let's Go For Away For Awhile (2:18)
7
Sloop John B (2:58)
8
God Only Knows (2:51)
9
I Know There's An Answer (3:09)
10
Here Today (2:54)
11
I Just Wasn't Made For These Times (3:12)
12
Pet Sounds (2:22)
13
Caroline, No (3:05)
 
MASTERPIECE #129 A MEDITATION MASS YATHA SIDHRA
1
A Meditation Mass (40:14)
 
Peter Elbracht - Flute
Rolf Fichter - Moog synthesizer, Indian flute, vibes, electric piano, electric guitar, vocals
Klaus Fichter - drums, percussion
Matthias Nicolai - electric 12-string guitar, bass
MASTERPIECE #128 LIVE AT WEMBLEY ABBA
1
Joy (18:13)
2
Lotus Feet (4:44)
3
What Need I Have For This (29:03)
 
 
MASTERPIECE #127 HERE AT LAST... BEE GEES... LIVE THE BEE GEES
1
Joy (18:13)
2
Lotus Feet (4:44)
3
What Need I Have For This (29:03)
 
 
MASTERPIECE #126 SHAKTI SHAKTI
1
Joy (18:13)
2
Lotus Feet (4:44)
3
What Need I Have For This (29:03)
 
John McLaughlin - Guitar
Zakir Hussain - Tabla
Ramnad Raghavan - Mridangam
Lakshminarayana Shankar - Violin
Thetakudi Vinayakaram - Ghatam and Mridangam
 
 
 
 
 
MASTERPIECE #130 MOON SAFARI AIR
1
Wouldn't It Be Nice (2:25)
2
You Still Believe In Me (2:31)
3
Thats Not Me (2:28)
4
Don't Talk (Put Your Head On Your Shoulder) (2:53)
5
I'm Waiting For The Day (3:05)
6
Let's Go For Away For Awhile (2:18)
7
Sloop John B (2:58)
8
God Only Knows (2:51)
9
I Know There's An Answer (3:09)
10
Here Today (2:54)
11
I Just Wasn't Made For These Times (3:12)
12
Pet Sounds (2:22)
13
Caroline, No (3:05)
 
MASTERPIECE #129 THE DOORS THE DOORS
1
Break On Through The Other Side (2:29)
2
Soul Kitchen (3:28)
3
The Crystal Ship (2:34)
4
Twentieth Century Fox (2:33)
5
Alabama Song (3:20)
6
Light My Fire (7:06)
7
Back Door Man (3:34)
8
I Looked At You (2:22)
9
End Of The Night (2:52)
10
Take Is At Comes (2:23)
11
The End (11:41)
John Densmore – drums, backing vocals on Alabama Song
Ray Manzarek – Vox Continental, piano, keyboard bass, marxophone, backing vocals
Robby Krieger – guitar, backing vocals
Jim Morrison – lead vocals, percussion, handclaps
Guest:
Larry Knechtel
– bass guitar on Soul Kitchen, Twentieth Century Fox, Light My Fire, Back Door Man, I Looked At You, and Take It As It Comes
Paul Rothchild – backing vocals on Alabama Song
 
MASTERPIECE #128 FLY BY NIGHT RUSH
1
Wouldn't It Be Nice (2:25)
2
You Still Believe In Me (2:31)
3
Thats Not Me (2:28)
4
Don't Talk (Put Your Head On Your Shoulder) (2:53)
5
I'm Waiting For The Day (3:05)
6
Let's Go For Away For Awhile (2:18)
7
Sloop John B (2:58)
8
God Only Knows (2:51)
9
I Know There's An Answer (3:09)
10
Here Today (2:54)
11
I Just Wasn't Made For These Times (3:12)
12
Pet Sounds (2:22)
13
Caroline, No (3:05)
 
 
 
 
MASTERPIECE #125 JULY 15 1972 TAJ-MAHAL TRAVELLERS
1
Joy (18:13)
2
Lotus Feet (4:44)
3
What Need I Have For This (29:03)
 
 
 
 
 
 
MASTERPIECE #122 THE SIX WIVES OF HENRY VIII RICK WAKEMAN
1
Joy (18:13)
2
Lotus Feet (4:44)
3
What Need I Have For This (29:03)
 
 
MASTERPIECE #121 OXYGENE JEAN MICHEL JARRE
1
Oxygene (39:44)
 
 
Jean Michel Jarre - ARP 2600, EMS Synthi AKS, EMS VCS3, RMI Harmonic Synthesizer, Farfisa Professional Organ, Eminent 310U, Mellotron, Korg Minipops-7 rhythm machine, Theremin
MASTERPIECE #120 PLANETARY UNFOLDING MICHAEL STEARNS
1
Joy (18:13)
2
Lotus Feet (4:44)
3
What Need I Have For This (29:03)
 
 
 
MASTERPIECE #118 BEGGARS BANQUET THE ROLLING STONES
1
A Meditation Mass (40:14)
 
 
MASTERPIECE #117 76:14 GLOBAL COMMUNICATION
1
A Meditation Mass (40:14)
 
 
MASTERPIECE #116 SGT PEPPER'S LONELY HEART'S CLUB BAND THE BEATLES
1
A Meditation Mass (40:14)
 
 
MASTERPIECE #115 ELVIS: NBC TV SPECIAL ELVIS PRESLEY
1
A Meditation Mass (40:14)
 
 
MASTERPIECE #114 THE KOLN CONCERT KEITH JARRETT
1
A Meditation Mass (40:14)
 
 
MASTERPIECE #113 LIVE AT MONTEREY THE JIMI HENDRIX EXPERIENCE
1
Killing Floor (3:37)
2
Foxy Lady (3:38)
3
Like A Rolling Stone (6:52)
4
Rock Me Baby (3:30)
5
Hey Joe (4:02)
6
Can You See Me (2:54)
7
The Wind Cries Mary (3:48)
8
Purple Haze (5:07)
9
Wild Thing (7:58)
Jimi Hendrix – electric guitar, lead vocals
Mitch Mitchell – drums, backing vocals
Noel Redding – bass guitar, backing vocals
MASTERPIECE #112 LIVE AT THE MONTEREY POP FESTIVAL RAVI SHANKAR
1
Raga Bhimpalasi (27:30)
2
Raga Todi-Rupak Tal (6:15)
3
Tabla Solo in Ektal (7:12)
4
Raga Shudha Sarang -Tintal (22:46)
5
Dhun - In Dadra And Fast Teental (19:25)
 
Kamala Chakravaty - tamboura
Alla Rakha - tabla
Ravi Shankar - sitar
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
MASTERPIECE #103 ISON I / ECHOS / ISON II STEFAN NICULESCU
1
A Meditation Mass (40:14)
 
 
MASTERPIECE #102 WITCHI-TAI-TO JAN GARBAREK
1
Joy (18:13)
2
Lotus Feet (4:44)
3
What Need I Have For This (29:03)
 
Jon Christensen - drums
Palle Danielsson - bass
Jan Garbarek - tenor saxophone, soprano saxophone
Bobo Stenson - piano
 
 
MASTERPIECE #120 ASTIGMATIC KRZYSZTOF KOMEDA
1
Astigmatic (23:07)
2
Kattorna (7:30)
3
Svantetic (16:01)
 
Rune Carlson - drums
Krzysztof Komeda - piano
Günter Lenz - double bass
Zbigniew Namyslowski - saxophone
Tomasz Stańko - trumpet
 
 
 
 
MASTERPIECE #117 SLOVENIAN GIRLS SBB
1
A Meditation Mass (40:14)
 
MASTERPIECE #129 HERESIE UNIVERS ZERO
1
Wouldn't It Be Nice (2:25)
2
You Still Believe In Me (2:31)
3
Thats Not Me (2:28)
4
Don't Talk (Put Your Head On Your Shoulder) (2:53)
5
I'm Waiting For The Day (3:05)
6
Let's Go For Away For Awhile (2:18)
7
Sloop John B (2:58)
8
God Only Knows (2:51)
9
I Know There's An Answer (3:09)
10
Here Today (2:54)
11
I Just Wasn't Made For These Times (3:12)
12
Pet Sounds (2:22)
13
Caroline, No (3:05)
 
 
 
MASTERPIECE #127 FRIDAY NIGHT IN SAN FRANCISCO DEMEOLA LUCIA MCLAUGHLIN
1
Wouldn't It Be Nice (2:25)
2
You Still Believe In Me (2:31)
3
Thats Not Me (2:28)
4
Don't Talk (Put Your Head On Your Shoulder) (2:53)
5
I'm Waiting For The Day (3:05)
6
Let's Go For Away For Awhile (2:18)
7
Sloop John B (2:58)
8
God Only Knows (2:51)
9
I Know There's An Answer (3:09)
10
Here Today (2:54)
11
I Just Wasn't Made For These Times (3:12)
12
Pet Sounds (2:22)
13
Caroline, No (3:05)
 
MASTERPIECE #1 CALL OF THE VALLEY CHAURASIA KABRA SHARMA
1
Ahir Bhairav/Nat Bhairav (12:35)
2
Rag Piloo (7:58)
3
Bhoop (6:16)
4
Rag Des (6:09)
5
Rag Pahadi (6:48)
   
Hariprasad Chaurasia - bamboo flute
Brijbushan Kabra - Acoustic guitar, Slide guitar
Shivkumar Sharma - Santoor, Santur
Guest:
Manikrao Popatkar
- Tabla
MASTERPIECE #1 CLOSE TO THE EDGE YES
1
Close to the Edge (18:43)
2
And You and I (10:08)
3
Siberian Khatru (8:55)
 

Jon Anderson - lead vocals
Bill Bruford - drums, percussion
Steve Howe
- acoustic and electric guitar, electric sitar, backing vocals
Chris Squire - electric bass guitar, backing vocals
Rick Wakeman - mellotron, organ, synthesizer, harpsichord

Zee Legacy...
Before I even get to the legacy of this album, I must say that Yes' legacy has taken a nosedive ever since the late 70s. Yes (along with Led Zeppelin and Pink Floyd) were the flag-bearers of the late 60s and 70s extravagant prog rock oriented rock music. They were also among the biggest rock bands of the 70s just like Led Zeppelin and Pink Floyd. However Yes' forte was epic songs and epic music had fallen out of favor as early as 1975 when more accessible and hip forms of rock music like punk, disco, pop, arena rock and soft rock were making headlines. With the advent of punk rock in particular, the critics and young fans were up in arms against the inaccessible, extravagant and intellectual prog music and Yes were singled out as the biggest offenders. Also, Yes have failed to quit around their peaks (they should have really quit after Relayer) and have continued to make substandard material over the years with a myriad series of lineups which couldn't hold a candle to their peak lineups from 1969-1974. All these missteps and setbacks have harmed their legacy. Yes, at least among mainstream critics, don't get the the respect they really deserve.With the Internet file sharing boom of the 2000s, progressive rock has made a comeback and Yes are not as badly dismissed as they used to be. They are these days regarded as one of the best progressive rock bands of all time. This album in particular is considered the apex of prog rock. Even the classic rock community has conceded that this album is a shining moment of progressive rock. For once, I am in agreement with classic rock critics. This album perfects the idea of stringing riffs and solos together and constructive lengthy *progressive* songs that have different sections following a particular theme but sounding radically different from each other. Many rock bands have made lengthy exploratory music over the years, but none have kept it continuously interesting with nary a moment of boredom, as this band did with this album.

Zee Sound...

I wonder why the Yesmen called this album Close To The Edge. Were they signalling to the world that this album was their travel to the edges of the rock music universe? Until this album the band had been slowly progressing from humble psychedelic pop/rock (self titled debut) to sophisticated classical+jazz based rock (Fragile), but they were still making rock music. What the hell is this? Nothing on Fragile gave us any warning that the Yesman would conjure something monumental and magical as Close To The Edge. How they managed to make something so beautiful yet so spectactularly jaw-dropping, all in a space of just six months after Fragile, with the same lineup, is beyond me. None of the albums that preceded this album sounded like this. The album is a true progression of the Yes sound. It seems like the Yesmen were listening to Mahavishnu Orchestra's The Inner Mounting Flame at the time of recording this. The drums on the record sound more jazzy than usual and the ensemble performance of the band is fast, technically advanced and complex just like Mahavishnu Orchestra's commercially and artistically successful debut album which was released in August '71. I also have a suspician Jon Anderson might have got wind of Vangelis' experiments with the Greek band Aphrodite's Child on the underground hit album 666 which was released by the time this record was getting recorded. Jon used the cosmic sounding atmospheric tapes to great effect in this album. Also, Rick Wakeman's keyboard tone have a grand cosmic feeling here that was absent on Fragile. The same cosmic feeling can be heard in the flawed but ambitious 666. I highly recommend you to check out that album. This album is otherworldly with a capital O. It's hard to describe this magical album. You have to listen to the three songs on the album to get that feeling.

Close To The Edge - The title track is a busy eighteen minute song that has the power, the energy, the drive and an unmatched beauty to it that it takes the listener to heavenly worlds only poets, philosophers or painters could envision of. Not one second is wasted here and not once you get the feeling here that this is a long song. Such is a beauty of this song. The song goes through various sections that evokes different moods - cosmic, atmospheric, jazzy, rocking, funky, classical... even rap... you name it. In my opinion, this is the best performance of every member of the band. The solos are incredible and the instrumental interludes perfectly flow into each other. This is a masterpiece of the highest order.

And You And I -The second song And You and I is the acoustic piece of the album. It is the mellowest of the three. The song features Steve Howe's most delicate and melodic finger picking on classical guitar ever and Rick Wakeman's most majestic sounding symphonic keyboards ever.

Siberian Khatru - Siberian Khatru is the fastest song on the album and rocks the most. But it is by no means simple. It has several incredible solos on different string instruments by both Howe and Wakeman, the section in which the harpsichord solo following the electric sitar solo being the most exquisite. This song brings the album to to a fiery end. A perfect way to close out the album in my opinion.

Zee Songs...
There was no question here. Close To The Edge has to be #1. All the 24 albums behind this album are excellent. But none of them are executed this flawlessy. With every album that follows this album on the list, I feel there is some scope of improvement. I can't think of any thing I could change with this album. Everytime I listen to this album, my jaw drops to the floor. I consider all the song here as a perfect 10/10, which gives a perfect 10 to this album. So this is the ultimate perfect album of all time in my opinion.

Zee PROS UND Zee HOES...
Pros - Perfection with a capital P

Hoes - You really have to be a hoe to find a hoe in this album

Zee CHANGES...
In - None Out - None Shorten - None Lengthen - None Change - None

MASTERPIECE #1 ELECTRIC SCIENCE DZYAN
1
Back To Where We Came From (8:58)
2
A Day In My Life (4:03)
3
The Road Not Taken (4:55)
4
Khali (4:56)
5
For Earthly Thinking (9:38)
6
Electric Silence (4:30)
 

Peter Giger - drums, percussion
Reinhard Karwatky - electric bass guitar, synthesizer, mellotron
Eddy Marron
- electric guitar, sitar, saxophone


Zee Legacy

Zee Sound

Zee Songs

Zee PROS UND Zee HOES
Pros - ..

MASTERPIECE #4 PHAEDRA TANGERINE DREAM
1
Phaedra (17:39)
2
Mysterious Semblance At The Strand Of Nightmares (9:55)
3
Movements Of A Visionary (7:56)
4
Sequent C (2:13)
 

Peter Baumann - organ, piano, synthesizer, flute
Christopher Franke - synthesizer
Edgar Froese
- mellotron, electric guitar, electric bass guitar, synthesizer, organ

Zee Legacy...
Zee Sound...
.

Zee Songs...

Zee PROS UND Zee HOES...
Pros - ...

Hoes - ...

MASTERPIECE #5 THE PIPER AT THE GATES OF DAWN PINK FLOYD
1
Astronomy Domine (4:12)
2
Lucifer Sam (3:07)
3
Mathilda Mother (3:08)
4
Flaming (2:46)
5
Pow R Toc H (4:26)
6
Take Thy Stethoscope And Walk (3:05)
7
Interstellar Overdrive (9:41)
8
The Gnome (2:13)
9
Chapter 24 (3:42)
10
The Scarecrow (2:11
11
Bike (3:21)

Syd Barrett - acoustic and electric guitar, lead vocals
Nick Mason - drums, percussion
Roger Waters
- electric bass guitar, slide whistle, lead vocals
Rick Wright - organ, piano, celesta, backing vocals, lead vocals

Zee Legacy...
This is Pink Floyd debut album and only album with crazed genius Syd Barrett (one of his songs does make it to their sophomore album and he was an official physically present member on it, but that's besides the point). This album is critically acclaimed and was fairly successful in the UK but not so much in the US. This hasn't sold nearly as much as any of their latter albums courtesy of it being so different (and quite frankly, scary) than the rest of them. It is however held in very high regard and considered one of the most unique psychedelic enigmas of all time. You will probably never hear any of the songs on radio these days because the songs in here are just too far out. This is truly one of a kind album - even moreso than the three albums preceding this on the list. Pink Floyd fans are themselves quite divided on the album. Many Pink Floyd fans only appreciate the latter commercially successful period starting Meddle (or starting The Dark Side Side Of The Moon, if you are a true starfucker). You might encounter several fans who simply do not get the fuss about this album. There are some who like every Pink Floyd album except this! (I myself was in this position not long ago until lightning from the heavens struck my thick skull... shudder to think of those dumb ol' days). On the contrary, there are some who seem to like this album very much but do not think much of their latter material. I am perhaps in the minority who thinks all Pink Floyd albums from the 60s and 70s have something of some merit, but only few stand out, and this is one of them. This one is definitely not for casual rock listeners by any means. This is quite possibly the most shocking album ever!

Zee Sound...
First of all before I even get into the sound of the album, I have one strong recommendation. Go and ***BUY the MONO VERSION*** of the album! I can't stress hard enough. The mono version is absolutely mind-blowing. The quality is excellent, the sound is crystal clear and the mix is far superior to the stereo version. The stereo version does not suck but is somewhat tame in comparision. This mono version is just to simply put in few words... out of this world. You can hear guitar and organ sounds that are not really audible in the stereo version. Moreover, Syd Barrett's and Rick Wright's vocals sound more prominent and harmonize better. Just buy it, okay??? The engineering job on this album is excellent to say the least. The engineer on this album is one unheralded genius from Abbey Road studios called Peter Bown... more about him here. Pete Bown was considered an electronic genius and considering the fact there are no synthesizers on this album, this was a stroke of genius by Pete Bown and Syd Barrrett/Rick Wright who contributed synthesizer like effects to make this sound very electronic for 1967. This album is however not Hawkwind kind of electronic space rock, it is in fact unclassifiable by all means imaginable. Piper is weird but not entirely weird, it is psychedelic but not entirely psychedelic, it is heavy but not entirely heavy, it is experiemental but not entirely experimental either. There is just no words to describe it. All the songs on the album sound different to each other and they all seem to go in different directions. They all have a twisted sense of melody which are not pleasant like The Beatles, or catchy like The Rolling Stones, but are nevertheless still memorable. There is a lot of variety in here. There is space rock/progressive rock (Astronomy Domine), rhythmic protopunk (Lucifer Sam), psychedelic rock (Matlida Mother and Flaming), tribal jungle music (Pow R Toc H), cacophonic heavy metal (Take Thy Stethescope And Walk), experimental avant-garde (Interstellar Overdrive), psychedelic folk (The Gnome, Chapter 24 and Scarecrow) and musique-concrete (Bike). Its all in there, the album is highly varied, unique and a BOLD piece of art.

Astronomy Domine - Astronomy Domine is among the very first space rock songs... and it has no synthesizer! In fact there is no synthesizer on this entire album... except Syd Barrett's guitar which he managed to process in such a way that it sounded like a synthesizer. And of course Rick Wright's jazz influenced organ and Pete Bown's engineering which makes every instrument sound crystal clear. The echoey sounding guitar tone on this song was apparently achieved by feeding the guitar through a binson echo machine. This gives the songs that distinctive spacey astro sound. The song begins with Peter Jenner (Pink Floyd's manager) annoucing unintelligably the name of some stars on a megaphone. While the spacey sounding annoucement fades to the backgroud, a rhythm guitar line starts following it, until you hear the first cymbal crashes. Soon a more wicked sounding lead guitar line (Duane Eddy + Jimi Hendrix like) joins in and sets the song in motion. Repetitive cymbal crashes along with a dancey bass line and background sound providing organ follow the guitar song throughout. The vocals on the song are shared by Rick Wright and Syd Barrett. Their vocals sound complementary to each other. Syd has a sharper boyish voice, Rick has a duller mature voice. But remarkably both their vocals sound alike! When Rick sings lead Syd goes to the background and vice versa. This cool alternating vocal effect also adds to the spaciness of the song. Wonderful song! without this song, there would be no Hawkwind, Tangerine Dream or Ash Ra Tempel for sure. This song singlehandedly gave birth to space rock!

Lucifer Sam - This sounds like a James Bond theme crossed with a Spiderman theme. It has a spy thriller sound to it but it is fast as hell. Again it is the guitar leading the sound and again it sounds quite creepy. This song has some of Mason's loudest drumming and sounds heavy metal (for 1967). Pink Floyd a loud band? Hell yeah, at least this version; I can't think of a louder band in 1967 except The Jimi Hendrix Experience. This song has a striking sound and gets over even before you can even comprehend what the hell it is about. This is my favorite song on the album after Astronomy Domine. I love the song so much that I wish it were longer.

Matilda Mother - Did someone say that this is a psychedelic rock album? Where are the psyhedelic songs until now, then? This is the album's first real psychedelic song, albeit quite heavy and not at all in the hippie flower power kind of way. Pink Floyd sounded closest they ever did to Jimi Hendrix Experience in this song. It begins with a short plucked guitar intro followed by a heavy bass (Waters at his best), until Syd starts his uttering his first fairy tale phrases. The guitar is largely in the background in this song but when it comes to the foreground it is quite powerful. This song is dominated by organ and also features a great solo in the middle (you can hear it if you play close attention). But what I am most impressed by is the bass on the song which gives it a very echoey feeling (somewhat similar to Astronomy Domine). Just like Astronomy Domine, Syd and Rick alternate lead vocals and towards the end sing an endearing worldless harmony. Considering they have both passed away and considering that I like their vocals better than Waters or Gilmour who would sing a lot more in future, I like this song very much. This song is the most complicated song on the album. And is very unusual to say the least.

Flaming - The song begins with a slide whistle played by Roger Waters. The song is full of sound effects like bells (maracas?), whoosh sounds (organ?) and echoes (on bass). The guitar functions like another organ and it is hard to say which sound effect is produced by which instrument. The lyrics are child like and music reflects the theme. I find this song short and sweet.

Pow R Toc H - Welecome to the most exotic sounding song on the album! The song is mostly instrumental except for some hilarious sound effects by Barrett and Waters (apparently inspired by Lovely Rita recorded next door by the Beatles). This is by far the most insane song on the album. The songs sounds like African ritualistic tribal howls with percussion music in the background. The piano is the driving force here, but I love how Mason plays the tribal sounding drums. That sound was absolutely essential to the song. Waters and Barrett's vocal improvisations are funny but also add to the exoticness of the song. I like the distorted sound of the guitar which makes a cameo appearance in the song. This is an interesting instrumental and adds to the variety of the album.

Take Thy Stethescope And Walk - This song is the least liked of all songs by critics. Its is a heavy cacophonic song, but it does not sound out of place. In fact Pow R Toc H segues effortlessly into this. This was the only song on the album in which Barrett had no part in writing. This is a Waters song. I like this song very much and I think it contributes very much to the album's manicness and prepares the listener to the experimental epic that follows. The drums are super heavy on this with the guitar and organ going absolutely bonkers during the long middle instrumental interlude. The lyrics sound nonsensical but this is mostly an instrumental song with absolute kick-ass performance by the band.

Interstellar Overdrive - The mono version is a real improvement here as the guitar sound is more piercing and the organ is more prominent. This is usually considered the best song on the album. But I think it goes on for quite a bit. The opening guitar riff which starts the song is quite addictive. After the opening rocking bit for about 21/2 minutes, the song becomes free form avant-garde free of structure. During the entire improvisation bit, the organ sounds quite synth like, the guitar makes strange synth like noise and the bass and drums give solid percussion effect in the background. The song ends with the same wicked riff that started the song but with more special effects that segue into the next song The Gnome. This is the best showcase for Rick Wright's organ on the album and also the best showcase for Syd's various slide effects on the guitar.

The Gnome - This is the second part of the album - the acoustic dreamier side of the album (the songs before these are louder, urgent and spooky). The Gnome has Barrett on acoustic guitar for the first time and he does some nice strumming in this song dominated by vocals. The bass is the heavy instrument here and provides the song some power. There are no drums here but Mason plays some delicate percussion. Wright plays some beautiful celesta which makes a stealthy and sneaky cameo in the middle of song. I feel the celesta part is absolutely essential for this song. This is the most melodic song on the album and reminds me of the Beatles' folkier songs. This is the closest they came to sounding like The Beatles.

Chapter 24 - This is another folksy song but it is more philosophical sounding than The Gnome. The bass on this is absolutely incredible (somewhat like Paul McCartney's bass on most of Sgt Pepper album). Barrett plays nothing here. This vocal performance however is very good and sounds very sincere to the topic. Mason plays some light percussion. The song is dominated by Wright's folksy sounding organ and piano flourishes and Waters chunky bass.

Scarecrow - This is the third folk song in the row. Mason again plays some percussion (this time it sounds a lot more rural than before). The song is driven by Wright's organ and the acoustic guitar and bass only show up towards the end of the song. This is the shortest song on the album but with its piper like organ sounds contributes to the exotic theme of the album.

Bike - This is the final song on the album. It starts like a childish and innocent song but totally goes crazy towards the end music concrete section (somewhat like the ending of A Day In The Life', but a lot more scarier). The song is dominated by slapping drums until the experimental climax. The climatic music concrete section begins with pre-recorded sounds of bells, gong, oscillators, some violin and some other noise. The song ends with a sped up laughter coda which seriously freaks me out everytime I listen to it.

Zee Songs...
Flow - This album flows very well until the middle when the long avantgarde instrumental Interstellar Drive somewhat slows down the album. The songs after that are mostly acoustic in nature. I give it a 9.95 out of 10 for this. Its not perfect but it almost as good as they could have done. If Interstellar Overdrive was a bit shorter and they squeezed in more pyschedelic/space rock numbers before the folk rock section, it would have been more fun in my opinion.

Shockingness - Truly shocking for 1967. A perfect 10/10

Selection - Though there is not a single clunker, I don't agree with inclusion of Scarecrow which was already released as a B-side. I also don't think Interstellar Overdrive should be that long. A lengthy version works better in a live album, but this isn't a live album. I would have included at least Lucy Leave and King Bee from the first recording session in 1965. But the fact is it would have been odd to include songs which they had recorded with Bob Klose who was no longer in the line-up. So I cannot blame them. I would a loved a bit more spacey songs though. So I will give the album 9.95/10 for song selection, Instrumentation - Though technically Pink Floyd are not as talented as Led Zeppelin, Yes (best line up) or Deep Purple (best line up), the playing here is incredibly tight. The weakest members technically are Waters and Mason and even they play out of their mind here. I would saying instrumentation is 10/10. None of the four guys overplay nor they underplay their instruments and Barrett and Wright are excellent.

Independance - This album was the genius of Syd Barrett and company. They did use a marvellous engineer Pete Bown who knew how to record a psychedelic album. But he had good material to work with it. I give this also a 10/10.

Uniqueness - This puts the U in unique. This was a brand new sound. And Floyd would not continue this as they would never record a full-fledged with Barrett again. So this has a special mystique surrounding it. A 10/10 for uniqueness.

Execution - I think execution of all songs are spot on. There is nothing extra, nothing less. All songs fulfil what they were set out for. I give it a 10/10

The average score for the album based on the 7 quality factors above is
9.99

Zee PROS UND Zee HOES...
Pros - Though many of the songs may not be instantly catchy, they all contribute to the charm of this one of a kind album. This album hardly had hits and I feel it should have had a few. This is definitely the most groundbreaking albums of 1967 and it surpasses what The Doors, The Velvet Underground and The Jimi Hendrix Experience debuts achieved, because the overall creativity of this album is higher than those and also beause it doesn't have any clunkers unlike the others. The Doors had groundbreaking psychedelics in few of the songs, but most of the weaker songs sound like retro rock n roll music or worse carnival music. The Velvet Underground And Nico is really groundbreaking but has few slumber inducing art pop songs that fail to make an impression. Are You Experience is a heavy dose psychedelic experience but has about 40% unmemorable songs. This is Floyd's most consistent effort along with The Dark Side Of The Moon.

Hoes - Not much. Just need to shorten Interstellar Overdrive or chuck it out and release it in a live album

Zee CHANGES...
In - Lucy Leave, King Bee Out - The Scarecrow, Interstellar Overdrive Shorten - Pow R Toc H Lengthen - Astronomy Domine Change - None

MASTERPIECE #5 THE DARK SIDE OF THE MOON PINK FLOYD
1
Speak To Me (1:30)
2
Breathe (2:43)
3
On The Run (3:36)
4
Time (5:55)
5
Breathe - Reprise (1:12)
6
The Great Gig In The Sky (4:36)
7
Money (6:22)
8
Us And Them (7:46)
9
Any Colour You Like (3:25)
10
Brain Damage (3:48)
11
Eclipse (2:03)

David Gilmour - electric, steel and slide guitar, synthesizer, lead vocals, production
Nick Mason - drums, rototoms, percussion, tape effects, production
Roger Waters
- electric bass guitar, synthesizer, lead vocals, production
Rick Wright - organ, electric piano, synthesizer, lead vocals, production

Guests: Clare Torry - vocals on The Great Gig In The Sky and Dick Parry - saxophone on Money and Us And Them

Zee Legacy...
Was this the band which once made The Piper At The Gates Of Dawn? Holy fucking shit! What a change! This sounds nothing like Piper. And it is yet abso-fuckingly brilliant as Piper. This is the Syd-less Floyd at their peak. They would never reach these heights again. This album has sold in excess of 45 million albums worldwide already and is the second most selling rock album after AC/DC's Back In Black. The fact that this album sold this much without the aid of MTV videos, is quite remarkable. But sales numbers don't really determine legacy. I was pointing out the numbers to show popular this album has been. The album carries a (unexaggerated pessimism - unlike the cornily overly dramatic exaggerated and at times whiny pessimism on their future albums like Wish You Were Here, Animals and The Wall) social message which have touched the hearts of audiences of all demographics. Also the negativity here is philosophical and leaves a ray of hope. It is accessible, but not in a corny way and most of it rocks and is quite dynamic. So everyone from classic rock fanatics to prog-nerds to headbangers seem to enjoy it.

Zee Sound...
Part of its popularity is the excellent engineering and production on this album. The sound quality is crisp, dynamic and sparkly. You can clearly hear the nuances of all the sound effects (pre-recorded sounds and synthesizers), guitars, drums and bass. I did a research on who were the engineers for all the Pink Floyd albums. And I found that two guys Pete Bown and Alan Parsons were involved in their most dynamic albums. Pete Bown was on Piper, Alan Parsons was on Dark Side and both of them were on Atom Heart Mother, my third favorite Floyd album (flawed enough to be a lot further down the list). Pete Bown was also involved with Meddle but they used many other engineers there and under-utilized him. Pete Bown is considered to be unsung hero for the sound on Piper. He was considered an electronics wizard just like Alan Parsons. Alan Parsons who also engineered Abbey Road got more recognition for Dark Side than Pete Bown ever did for Piper. But anyway, these two engineers seemed to have done more than what typical engineers do for album recording. And that seems to have helped. I am quite insistent on this topic as I feel many Pink Floyd albums like A Saucerful Of Secrets, More, Ummagumma, Meddle and Obscured By Clouds seem to lack a killer punch and sounded duller than the rest and others like Wish You Were Here, Animals and The Wall sound mechanical and overcooked and could have used electronic gurus like Pete Bown or Alan Parsons. Since I have spoken too much about the recording, let me speak about the contents. Musically this album is a one-song album with several parts really. All the songs flow into each other and there are no gaps on the album. Some of the songs like Speak to Me and Breathe are so closely related that they are hard to separate. The album is is human greed, paranoia and selfishness which leads to disillusionment, insanity and slow death. In spite of the morose topic, the album does not come off as self-pitying. The music has a soothing feel to it. I think the signature moment of the album is the spoken line during the climax - "there is no dark side in the moon, really. As a matter of fact it's all dark". This pretty much sums up the album - It is all dark and we need to embrace it. There is nothing to feel sorry about or worry about it. It is the truth of life. So it is essentially an optimistic take on a pessimistic prophesy. Does that sound confusing? Well, listen to the album once more and see if you can you see what I am able to. The most emotional song on the album is The Great Gig In The Sky which is a song about death. It is lead by piano and a woman wailing away wordlessly. It sounds simple but has a majestic end of an era feel to it. This is the song, I would want to play in my funeral - the one that signifies the end of my era. You know very few albums can capture this kind of emotion. No wonder this album has been universally accepted by people of all kinds. It touches you on an emotional level without ever being syrupy. The music on the entire album is excellent. My most favorite song on the album is Time. Gilmour plays some of his best pedal steel and slide guitar and one of the greatest guitar solos on it. Rick Wright is perfect on synthesizers, piano and organ and never goes overboard in the entire album. Waters lets his funk influences loose on this album. Was he listening to Curtis Mayfield's Superfly? released a year before. Even Mason contributes some really interesting drum parts like the rototoms on Time. If they were at their creative and frantic best on Piper, they were at their sonic best on Dark Side. This was their first real shocking album after Piper. Piper has quirky sound effects and processed sounds which is present here. After Syd, they went into a mellower territory with the albums before this. This was a return to the dynamic rock days. After Dark Side they would become more predictable. This just like Piper came out of the blue.

Zee Songs...
The Dark Side Of the Moon, the best Floyd post Syd Barrett era (and the two Hawkwind albums above it) matched their only album with Syd Barrett scoring 9.95 out of 10. Creativity wise, execution wise and production wise, all four were about equal. It was just too close to call. I decided to give The Dark Side the lowest ranking, because it is the least rocking venture of the four. The album would have beeen perfect if not for On The Run and Money. On The Run, I feel is a tad too long. I did not like Gilmour's singing as much on Money. Gilmour's scream singing doesn't work for me and Wright's somewhat relaxed singing would have been better, considering the dark humour of the lyrics in the song. I also would have preferred Wright singing on Brain Dmage and Gilmour on Eclipse instead of Waters, but Waters did a fine job anyways. I like Wright's vocals better than both Gilmour and Waters, so I would have preferred it be featured more on the album.

Zee PROS UND Zee HOES...
Pros - This is the biggest selling rock album from the 60s and 70s, for a reason. This is an artistic statement but very accessible and touching. Perfect execution of sound effects to. The philopshopy of the album is simple to understand and to the point. This is probably the best produced and engineered album of all time.

Hoes - There is no Syd... just joking... Just wish he could have given his input and voice (especially on songs like Speak To Me/Breathe/Breathe-Reprise where his voice would have been perfect) to this album. My only gripe is with On The Run which is a tad long and Money which is somewhat of a cacophonic misfit (courtesy Gilmour angry vocals).

Zee CHANGES...
In - None, Out - None, Shorten - On The Run Lengthen - Any Colour You Like Change - Wright sings instead of Gilmour in Money

MASTERPIECE #7 IF I COULD DO IT ALL OVER AGAIN I WOULD DO IT ALL OVER YOU CARAVAN
1
If I Could Do It All Over Again I Would Do It All Over You (3:07)
2
And I Wish I Were Stoned/Don't Worry (8:20)
3
As I Feel I Die (5:06)
4
With An Ear To The Ground You Can Make It/Martinian/Only Cox/Reprise (9:54)
5
Hello Hello (3:45)
6
Asforteri 25 (1:21)
7
Can't Be Long Now/Francoise/For Richard/Warlock (14:21)
8
Limits (1:35)
 
 
MASTERPIECE #8 AT THE CLIFFS OF RIVER RHINE AGITATION FREE
1
Through The Moods (13:28)
2
First Communication (8:56)
3
Dialogue And Random (0:57)
4
Laila (10:03)
5
In The Silence Of The Morning Sunrise (4:41)
 
 
 
 

Micheal Gunther - electric bass guitar
Micheal Hoenig - synthesizer
Gustl Lutjens - electric guitar
Burghard Rausch - drums
Lutz Ulbrich - electric guitar


Zee Legacy...
Zee Sound...

Zee Songs...

Zee PROS UND Zee HOES...
Pros - ...

Hoes - ...

MASTERPIECE #9 LIVE KRAAN
1
Jerk Of Life (4:57)
2
Nam Nam (15:10)
3
Holiday Am Marterhorn Including Gipselsturm (13:00)
4
Sarah's Ritt Durch Den Schwarzwald (6:00)
5
Andy Nogger (3:45)
6
Andy Nogger - Gutter King (6:45)
7
Hallo Ja Ja I Don't Know (13:28)
8
Lonesome Liftboy (5:15)
9
Kraan Arabia (12:30)
 
 
MASTERPIECE #10 HAWKWIND HAWKWIND
1
Hurry On Sundown (4:50)
2
The Reason Is? (3:30)
3
Be Yourself (8:09)
4
Paranoia - 1 (1:04)
5
Paranoia - 2 (4:11)
6
Seeing It As You Really Are (10:43)
7
Mirror Of Illusion (7:08)
 
 

Dave Brock - rhythm coustic guitar, harmonica, organ, percussion lead vocals
Michael Davies (a.k.a Dik Mik) - synthesizer, generator
John Harrison - lead electric bass guitar, background vocals
Huw Lloyd Langton
- electric guitar, background vocals
Terry Ollis - drums
Dick Taylor - lead electric guitar, production
Nik Turner - saxophone, flute, background vocals

Zee Legacy...
The only people who seem to love this album are the MIGHTY I and the band members. They insist this is their best studio album (actually most of it is a live jam which they didnt bother to re-record). And for once a band are right about their own work. Legacy wise, among prog fans (rock fans might be a little kinder, if they actually listened to this album) this has been largely ignored - primarily because this is not futuristic enough, does not have advanced synthesizers and does not sound like typical Hawkwind at all. This album didn't bother to disturb the charts and is considered as forgotten early work. This album is in the category of early album of many late 60s rock bands which do not represent the band's classic or commercially syuccessful sound, hence conveniently dismissed. But me says, this is one hell of jam-oriented album. This one of my absolute favorites and would be everyone's absolute favorites if they bothered to give it multiple listens. This music is a mish-mash of psychedelia, jazz, folk, funk and early electronic avant-garde/space music. This has so much of memorable music in it that I find it amusing that this album tanked and nearly broke up the band with three key members (Harrison, Langton, Taylor) leaving it.

Zee Sound...
Seems like seven was a lucky number for Hawkwind. Hawkwind had 7 guys in the lineup on Space Ritual and seven here. Seven is my favorite number too and Hawkwind has an awesome song called Seven By Seven. Though the number of individuals match between the both albums, only three members Brock, Turner and Davies are present in both the albums. This album is entirely unlike Space Ritual. Space Ritual was metal, psychedelic, space music, prog and punk all rolled into one. This is something bizarre. This is hardly electronic, but even more spaced out and trippier than Space Ritual. How exactly is that possible? Well, it has a one of kind sound that is minimal, repetitive, trance inducing yet something imaginable and organic. There is nothing artificial about this sound. The album also has more breathing space and is more deliberate than Space Ritual. Hawkwind were masters of space music. In fact one can arguably say Hawkwind's version of space rock is the only real space music. Ironically, they sounded as much space rock as they sounded heavy metal and and punk rock. In fact after you listen to Brainstorm on Space Ritual, you don't have to listen to any punk or protopunk. Hawkwind kick the living shit of any punk band that ever existed. But Brainstorm is not on this album and I digressed. This album sounds less metal, punk and space than Space Ritual, and more jazzy, bluesy, funky and folksy. Most of the album is a jam split into several songs. In fact the album opener and album closer (two of the finest psychedelic folk rock songs ever made) are the only real songs on the album. I initially did not get the rest of the songs on the album which are one fine jam after another. But once I got it I couldn't get enough of it. I highly recommend this album - do not listen to other idiots who think this is a forgettable early album. This might be an early album but this is an early firecracker of an album and there is nothing formative about it. You are listening toa fully function professional band at their peaks here. It so happens that Hawkwind nearly broke up after this album and would never repeat the same sound in any of their latter incarnations.

Zee Songs...
Flow - Thou shalt not ignore debut album of legendary progressive bands from the late 60s, early 70s, unless thou are a fucking moron. Yes time and again it has proved that unheralded/not as highly regarded as later debut albums with the not so classic sound of these bands, are actually fucking amazing. Take note of Can, Amon Duul II, Yes, Van Der Graaf Generator, Deep Purple, and fuck me Hawkwind. All these guys started with lineups which had nothing to do with their classic lineup or sound, yet made amazing albums which no one wants to buy or pay attention. Fucking Pathetic! Back to discussing the flow, this album flows like fine wine considering that almost 90% of the album is from a single jam session recorded live on studio. Yes, it is a 10/10.

Production - This is one of the few Zeppelin soundboard live recordings. For a bootleg, it is amazing in quality. I again give it a 10/10.

Selection - Why the fuck they didn't perform some of the songs I really love on Led Zeppelin I. No Good Times Bad Times, Babe I'm Gonna Leave You, Your Time Is Gonna Come. They also missed The Lemon Song, Livin Lovin Maid and Ramble On from Led Zeppelin II. I cannot honestly give it more than 9.95/10. Instrumentation - The performances are incredible. Can I give more than 10/10?

Independance - This is not like that SHITTTTTTY live album by Pink Floyd called PULSE. That one reeks and has an entire battalion of bored session musicians performing with "Pink Floyd" in the background. This is raw Led Zeppelin, no other cunt allowed on stage here. A 10/10.

Uniqueness - Can a live album really be unique? After all they are performing songs already released? It can be unique, if a band decides to NOT play the songs note by note unlike that cunt band which called themselves "Pink Floyd" on the PULSE album!!!! All songs here have something extra spice added to them courtesy improvisation by (on vocals) Plant and bass by Jonesy, Page on guitar, acoustic guitar, theremin and violin bow on guitar and ofcourse Bonzo on drum. I give this a 10/10

Execution - I think they go somewhat overboard on Dazed And Confused. And Plant's vocal ad-libbing does not always work (and sometimes detract from the awesome instrumentation in the background). Also, there is no way you can sit through entire 20 minutes of Moby Dick without a break. They could have split that into two. I give it 9.95/10

The average score for the album based on the 7 quality factors above is
9.9

Zee PROS UND Zee HOES...
Pros - Hawkwind's debut is gruesomely underrated. Hawkwind were at their best live. Though this is technically not a live album, most of it was recorded as one jam and pretty much in one take. This line-up is vastly different and had a vastly different sound. They would never record another album with this kind of sound.

Hoes - The Reason Is? does not have much going on and would have been an excellent minute and a half intro to Be Yourself, instead it drags on for three-half minutes, a whole two minutes longer than it should have been. I also do not see the point in splitting up the Sunshine Special jam into many songs. They could have shortened The Reason Is? and included Kiss Of The Velvet Whip, which was recorded but not released and is nowadays featured on the disc as a bonus song.

Zee CHANGES...
In - Kiss Of The Velvet Whip Out - None Shorten - The Reason Is? Lengthen - None Change - None


MASTERPIECE #11 SPACE RITUAL HAWKWIND
1
Earth Calling (1:44)
2
Born To Go (9:56)
3
Down Through The Night (6:16)
4
The Awakening (1:32)
5
Lord Of Night (7:21)
6
Black Corridor (1:51)
7
Space Is Deep (8:13)
8
Electronic No.1 (2:26)
9
Orgone Accumulator (9:59)
10
Upside Down (2:43)
11
10 Seconds Of Forever (2:43)
12
Brainstorm (9:20)
13
7 By 7 (6:11)
14
Sonic Attack (2:54)
15
Time We Left This World Today (5:47)
16
Master of The Universe (7:37)
17
Welcome To The Future (2:04)

Dave Brock - electric guitar, lead vocals
Robert Calvert
- lead vocals
Michael Davies (a.k.a Dik Mik) - synthesizer
Del Dettmar
- synthesizer
Ian Kilmister (a.k.a. Lemmy) - electric bass guitar, vocals
Simon King - drums
Nik Turner - saxophone, flute, vocals

Zee Legacy...
Hawkwind never broke through to the US. And since most bands' legacy is defined by how much they achieve in the US, they didn't receive much mainstream media attention. However, they were quite popular in the UK, and are still one of the most popular cult bands ever. This album in particular is considered one of the best live albums ever and very popular among pyschedelic rock/space rock/metal and even punk rock fans. This is also probably the only Hawkwind's album which is considered a classic. Very few bands will claim that their best album is a live album. But Hawkwind were always better live. Their studio albums were most of the time amateurly produced. The power and the fury of the band came into the fore only when they played live. Their second best album which is on this list as well is their debut album and it was also live... in the studio. Hawkwind were a volatile energetic unit and were at their best when they had a freedom to do anything they want. On this album, the band takes most of their best songs and perform with such kinetic energy and power that the live versions obliterate all the studio versions. Those who pay attention to this album will agree that this is one of most energeric live performances of all time by *any band*. I think this is an essential heavy metal album and perhaps the ultimate head-banging record of all time. But this is also the most essential punk album, most essential space rock album and most essential psychedelic album. This album easily blows away the heaviest albums out there when it comes to pure energy, noise, trippiness and heaviness.

Zee Sound...
On the sleeve, it says that this is 88 minutes of brain damage. And thats what this album is all about. Total carnage, total destruction and total havoc! This might make a good soundtrack to the bloodiest wars fought on earth - the World War II, though the music sounds futuristic as though it could be a soundtrack to World War III. The rhythm section of King and Kilmister is an ear and earth shattering blast of nuclear proportions. Kilmister (Lemmy) who was really a guitarist converted to a bassist, plays bass the only way he knew it - fast and heavy and leading the melodies in all the songs. I don't know of any bassist who can play bass like that. He plays with so much confidence that the rest of the band is merely playing catch up with him. The album has the speed and chaos of a punk album, the weird electronics of a psychedelic album and noisy heavy guitar of a heavy metal album. The saxophone and synthesizers contribute trippy psychedelics, while the distorted guitar and bass create a cloud of space dust. The performance is mindblowingly tight and unbelievably energetic - this is easily the best live album ever. Hawkwind would never be able to repeat this as this lineup would dissolve with Dik Mik and resident poet Bob Calvert leaving the band immediately after this album. Calvert would leave because the drug fuelled atmosphere was too much for his tender psyche. Funnily, Dik Mik would leave the band because the rest of the band bar Lemmy were doing different drugs, weed as opposed to speed. This speed vs. weed war would eventually result in Lemmy also getting fired. This is a album with the 7 men lineup. The other two albums on the list also had 7 people on it. 7 members - what a clusterfuck, isn't it? Well Hawkwind's music was never messy but highly layered and muddy. The 7 members here all serve different purposes and do their duties with little restraint. Hawkwind was more of a underground nihilistic concept than a band really; and that explains the revolving door nature of their lineups. They were a rebellious unit who didn't give fuck all to critical acclaim or commercial success. They did concerts for free, for fuck's sake. Their carefree nature is very evident in the performances on this album.

Zee Songs...
Most bands make the mistake of replicating studio versions note by note. That is boring. The best live bands are those who do not play the studio versions note to note. Hawkwind were too rebellious to play the studio songs the same way when they played live. This album gives us all the signs of a band in their own world. The energy and insanity of the album is shocking to say the least. This is the type of album you listen to and then hope it never ends. The album seems to send the listener into an infinite loop of trance. This is my favorite car album and also my favorite workout album. This is in my opinion the first full blown punk album. But then it is also an excellent space rock, psychedelic rock, progressive rock and heavy metal album. I can't think of many things would change here. My only rant is why did they not include a single song from their excellent debut? Be Yourself would have fit in just about perfect. They also missed out on their excellent single Silver Machine. Why not add more songs - this could probably have been a mightier triple album? I would have loved this to be #1 but Close To The Edge leaves me perfectly satisfied, this leaves me wanting for more mayhem. I also think Time We Left This World Today is too repetitive compared to the rest. They could have shortened it and could have added any (or all) of the many great songs they made prior to this album - Hurry On Sundown, Be Yourself, Paranoia, Seeing It As You Really Are and Mirror Of Illusion from the debut, You Shouldn't Do That from the second album In Search Of Sunrise, the singles Urban Guerilla and Silver Machine and also the delicious unreleased song Kiss Of The Velvet Whip recorded during the debut album sessions.

Earth Calling/Born To Go - Earth Calling gives a distorted intro

And You And I -The second song And You and I is the acoustic piece of the album. It is the mellowest of the three. The song features Steve Howe's most delicate and melodic finger picking on classical guitar ever and Rick Wakeman's most majestic sounding symphonic keyboards ever.

Siberian Khatru - Siberian Khatru is the fastest song on the album and rocks the most. But it is by no means simple. It has several incredible solos on different string instruments by both Howe and Wakeman, the section in which the harpsichord solo following the electric sitar solo being the most exquisite. This song bring the album to to a fiery end. A perfect way to close out the album in my opinion.

Zee PROS UND Zee HOES...
Pros - This is an earthquake. I listened to this album first time while driving. And I was pumped and blown away with the opening beats, that I almost ran into another car! Kilmister and King provide the greatest rhythm section ever where they lead and dominate every song.

Hoes - Need more songs!!! Where are the songs from the debut? Okay Seeing It As You Really Are was fused together with You Shouldnt Do That and performed, but was never released in the original version of the album. Where is their most successful single - Silver Machine? I can see many songs being added to this album. This could have been a triple album - and even more monstrous than it already is.

Zee CHANGES...
In - Hurry On Sundown, Be Yourself, Paranoia, Seeing It As You Really Are, Kiss Of The Velvet Whip, You Shouldnt Do That, Silver Machine, and Urban Guerilla Out - None Shorten - Time We Left This World Today Lengthen - None Change - None

MASTERPIECE #12 LED ZEPPELIN LED ZEPPELIN
1
Good Times Bad Times (2:47)
2
Babe I'm Gonna Leave You (6:41)
3
You Shook Me (6:30)
4
Dazed And Confused (6:27)
5
Your Time Is Gonna Come (4:34)
6
Black Mountain Side (2:13)
7
Communication Breakdown (2:30)
8
I Can't Quit You Baby (4:43)
9
How Many More Times (8:28)
   

John Bonham (a.k.a. Bonzo) - drums, timpani, backing vocals,
John Paul Jones (a.k.a. Jonesy) - electric bass guitar, organ, electric piano, bass pedals
Jimmy Page (a.k.a. Pagey) - acoustic, electric and lap steel guitar, violin bow on electric guitar, backing vocals, production
Robert Plant (a.k.a. Percy) - harmonica, lead vocals
Guests: Viram Jasani - tabla on Black Mountain Side

Zee Lineup...
Led Zeppelin is the only major mainstream rock band who had only line-up from beginning to end. Pink Floyd had Syd Barrett as the guitarist before Dave Gilmour joined them to eventually replace him.

Zee Legacy...
Led Zeppelin's self titled debut was like a nuclear explosion in the world of rock 'n roll. There was never an album before that had such virtuosic instrumentation, such thunderous drumming, such dominant bass, such tremor causing powerful wide range singing, and such prominent yet melodic guitar riffing and soloing. In fact Led Zeppelin never topped this album in the studio in terms of sheer audacity of the performances of each individual members. It is still considered a groundbreaking album and it seems highly improbable that this album was recorded in 1968. Remember that, this was the time when the flower wearing tree hugging hippies who enjoyed peaceful jams. This album changed the course of rock n roll and is considered a landmark album in rock history. Led Zeppelin I and II pretty much created heavy metal and were a huge influence on Deep Purple who converted themselves from a classical music and psychedelic rock influenced heavy psych band to a ballsy prog metal band, and on Black Sabbath, whose members have confessed to have been obssessed with this album when they were forming the band. In fact Geezer Butler of Black Sabbath says all they did those early days was listen to the first two Zeppelin albums day in day out. This album frequently shows up at the top of rock album lists. Some fans consider Led Zeppelin II and Led Zeppelin IV as better albums since they had more hits. Some suggest that Physical Graffiti might be their best effort because it has more songs and is more epic in nature. Regardless, this album is loved very much by Zeppelin fans and considered among their best efforts. I consider this their best effort in studio.

Zee Sound...
The album primarily features a new sound (for that time) which is an extension, progression and amplication of the traditional sounds of blues, folk, Western classical and Eastern classical. There is a lot of diversity here - classical/folk (Babe I'm Gonna Leave You), psychedelia (Dazed And Confused), hard rock (Good Times Bad Times), punk (Communication Breakdown), Indian classical music (Black Mountain Side), Western classical (Your Time Is Gonna Come), latin dance rhythm/progressive rock (How Many More Times) and blown-up blues (You Shook Me, and I Can't Quit You Baby). Though most of the album is heavy (especially Good Times Bad Times, Communication Breakdown, Dazed And Confused and How Many More Times) and has a dynamite sound, it is not a typical metal album. Led Zeppelin were not out there out to scare people like Black Sabbath or prove they are the loudest band ever like Deep Purple. They were naturally heavy. They also knew how to produce a good album. Jimmy Page's usage of the natural room ambience of the studio for recording this album was just plain genius. Though Led Zeppelin II might be equally explosive, this album is less song oriented and more musical. This is pure heavy psychedelic mayhem. The band were out there to prove to the world that a new force has arrived and they sent out a strong signal

Zee Songs...
This is the band at their most pyschedelic. Just think about it, every song on this album has a drugged out, spaced out feel to it. Led Zeppelin II is as heavy as this album but not all the songs on it sound pyschedelic. Starting with Led Zeppelin III, they moved on to a broader style incorporating folk, country, reggae, world music, funk and keyboard driven prog. They did make some psychedelic oriented classics later on like Whole Lotta Love, What Is And What Should Never Be, Ramble On, Travelling Riverside Blues, Hey Hey What Can I Do, Gallows Pole, Tangerine, Thats The Way, Going To California, The Rain Song, No Quarter and Ten Years Gone but these were scattered sparsely across different albums. On this album however, almost every song has a trippy feel to it, which makes this album positively captivating. In fact I think this is one of the best progressive-pyschedelic rock albums recorded along with Pink Floyd, Hawkwind, Deep Purple, Yes, Black Sabbath debuts, and Van Der Graaf Generator's sophomore album. Since none of these bands sounded similar to each other even at their progressive-pyschedelic stages, I would urge fans of psychedelic rock to check out all these seven albums. Coming back to this album, everyone of the songs on the album is instantly memorable in spite of the fact that majority of the songs are long! Yes, look at all the Zeppelin studio albums and you will see this is the only album which has 4 songs going past the 6 minute mark and two other clocking more than 4 1/2 minutes on two sides alone. And curiously none of the songs seem to drag!

Good Times Bad Times – The album kicks off with one of the most explosive songs they have ever recorded. Some fans believe this has perhaps Jimmy Page's best guitar solo and Jones' most complicated basslines. They are right. Jones says he wrote the complex guitar riff. The central guitar and bass riff on the song is twisted and evil sounding. That gives the song the punch. The complexity of the riff might be one reason they hardly performed this song live in its entirety even though it is considered an uber-classic. The drums on this song are also very heavy and in my opinion is the first instance of overt heavy metal drumming. Apparently there was only one bass drum used in the song (in fact Bonzo hardly used double bass drum since his double bass drumming was so heavy that it drowned out the rest of the band - and the other band members apparently stole it) but it sounds like a double kick. This is one of the many tracks, I would recommend the listener to pay close attention to. Even though it is a short song, there are several intricate things going on in this song. The most interesting thing about the song is that in spite of its short length, it still manages to change its melodic line several time and go through phases with each instrument taking turn at shining while the others fade to background. In fact if you hear the instruments (bass, guitar, and drums) in isolation, they will eacg sound absolutely fantastic. Check out some bass cover, guitar cover and drums cover of the song on Youtube. Those will show how much work in to this short song. I only wish this song was longer.

Babe Im Gonna Leave You This song has, hands down, the greatest vocal performance by Robert Plant. And probably the most melodic guitar riff intro of all time by Jimmy Page. Page apparently used a Gibson J200 acoustic on it. It sounds very much classical. In fact it sounds somewhat like how Steve Howe of Yes sounded on the albums Fragile and Close To The Edge. Since there is not much electric guitar on this song, the bass functions like the electric guitar and along with the drums form a tight rhythm section while the guitar stays loose. The song alternates from delicate folk/classical sections to heavy jam sections back and forth. It is a folk song with a metal feel. Truely unique and hynotic to the hilt. There is a synth like sound during the intro which is probably one of Page's studio tricks. It sounds fabulously futuristic for 1968. I am not sure what instrument or studio effect they used, but it sounds fabulous. I would like to figure it out one day. The electric guitar though sparingly used, is used almost like a synthesizer. Though synthesizers were been used by few bands starting around 1967, it was not prevalently used until the 70s. But from what I have heard, only three guitartists Jimi Hendrix, Syd Barrett, and Jimmy Page made their guitar sound like a synthesizer. That is why I consider those three to be ultimate innovators of guitar. It would have been sweet to her them jam together. Imagine Syd on slide guitar, Page on bowed electric guitar, theremin and acoustic and Hendrix playing lead on electric. That would been amazing!

You Shook Me – This is one of the two blues cover songs on the album, the other being I Can't Quit You Baby. This is the longer song and also the better one. Every member gets to shine here. Jones on piano and electric piano, Page on electric guitar and slide guitar, Plant on harmonica and Bonham with this menacing presence on drums, give this old blues song a new twist. The harmonica on this song and the guitar on the song sound technically complex to say the least. I must say Plant is an underrated harmonica player. The harmonica solo in the middle of the song is not just one of the longest, but also one of the best I have heard. This song was apparently their favorite live song those days because every member gets to solo and this song also showcases the talents of each member. I like the song but I think it is too slow, a bit too wanky and drawn out for the rest of the album.

Dazed And Confused – Jimmy Page actually performed this song with the Yardbirds live but it was never recorded in studio. Judging by Yardbirds' live version of the song, I can safely say it is good they didn't record it. Their version does not hold a candle to the Zeppelin's take of this song. Zeppelin pretty much prove that they were a much better upgraded version of Yardbirds (same guitarist, but better singer, bassist and drummer). The Yardbirds were no pushovers and were a very good pioneering psychedelic/blues rock band themselves at least during their prime in 1964-66. But Zeppelin in my honest opinion took it to the next level. This is the most psychedelic song on the album with bowed guitar solo in the middle of the song which takes us to tripland. It is somewhat similar in structure to Babe Im Gonna Leave You in the sense that the song alternates in pace across different sections. On this song however, the delicate folk/classical sections of Babe I'm Gonna Leave You are replaced by weird trippy sections which alternate with massive jam sections where guitar, bass and drums rock away in unision. The song begins the famous Jonesy galloping bassline before the bowed guitar comes in with its echoey ping like sound which sounds like a synthesizer. Then the main riff comes in which is again on bowed guitar and this time it sound like a mellotron. This riff pretty much keeps alternating with sections which have heavy bass, drums and rhythm guitar riffs. When the song slows down Plant moans to a weird devilish bowed guitar riff and constant heavy bass which seems to be playing its own song. I must say the slow part of the song is my favorite. This section kind of precedes what the German space music oriented bands like Ash Ra Tempel and Tangerine Dream would do in the 70s. The jam sections are mighty as well though and they give the kick the song needs to make it sound powerful. This is one of the most boldly and futuristic sounding Led Zeppelin ever made.

Your Time Is Gonna Come – This is one of the most unZeppelinesque song Zeppelin has recorded. The song starts with a minute-long church sounding solo on organ followed by the thundering blast on drums. The church organ gives away to a beautiful organ led melody. Then Page joins with the folkish guitar riff on an out of tune 10-string steel guitar. Jones uses bass pedals along with his organ. When the organs fade, slide guitar and acoustic guitar take over. When the guitars are gone, the drums take over and then the organ comes on back in. This was the beauty of Zeppelin (especially the ones which had both Jones and Page composing). Several instruments come and go. That is the secret weapon of Led Zeppelin that not many know of. Several instruments come and go and you don't notice it! This song is really hard to describe and classify (look at how many subgenres I have added next to the song for a short song!). The melody of the guitar is gentle, the organ is grand and the drums are devilishly heavy. A really strange Zeppelin song, butof course a memorable one. I think this song is my favorite song off Led Zeppelin I. Just wonderfully creative!

Black Mountain Side – One exotic song gives way to another. This is Page's attempt at creating a song which sounds Indian, Celtic and British folk all at the same time. The guitar sounds like a sitar and is accompanied by tabla played by drummer and sitarist Viram Jasani, a Kenyan born Indian. This is a beautiful mellow song which fits in the album nicely and is a welcome change of loudness to the album.

Communication BreakdownAnother short song follows Black Mountain Side but it sounds drastically different. This song is faster and heavier than an average Led Zeppelin song. Some considered it as protopunk considering its fast pace and in your face approach. Regardless, this 2 minute song has more technical complexity than most punk could muster in their entire discography. Zeppelin were not a punk band, they were far more talented. And far more revolutionary. This song has one of the most difficult and longest screams Plant ever produced. He never tried to match this live. Thats one of the reasons this song was never topped live. The guitar solo on this song is blistering and one of the fastest solo Page has produced. The drums are heavy and the bass is super busy. This is the most memorable song on this album. This is one of the few Zeppelin songs to feature backing vocals. Both Page and Jones provide great harmonies. The most captivating part of the song is the deadly machine gun like rhythm which is heavy on drum, bass and guitar in that order. This song is so groovy and catchy that you can't resist for you to go longer.

I Can't Quit You Baby – This is the weakest song on the album but by no means weak. This is the second Willie Dixon cover on the album and probably the most authentic blues rock song they recorded. Probably it is too authentic for comfort. I always liked Zeppelin better when they progressed things. This is the least progressive songs on the album and hence I do not like it as much as the others. It does have a pyschedelic tone to it and is compatible with the album and does not harm the album in any way. I would have replaced with their soulful organ led exotic sound r&b ode Baby Come On Home which was recorded during the sessions but never made it to the album.

How Many More TimesThey end the album with a bang. This is the best epic they recorded. It goes through so many sections all falling in place smoothly. It, just like Dazed in Confused, begins with a bass line intro. This intro however is faster and groovier.. After some bowed guitar effects, an awesome Latin influenced rhythm guitar comes in. The drums are also dancey. The hynotic jam like groove continues until the rhtytm guitar riff is replaced by slide guitar riff and the song changes to a guitar driven song. Soon the Latin rhythm sound reminiscent of the rhythm on Beck's Bolero (which was recorded by Jimmy Page/Jeff Beck/John Paul Jones/Nicky Hopkins/Keith Moon) comes in. Then it goes into a really creepy bowed guitar section around the 5 minute rock where the guitar literally sounds like a synthesizer. The the bass joins in and leads to the "rosie section" my favorite section of the song. Yes, this the section where Plant sings about some girl called rosie (really don't care about the lyrics, since the groove is mighty fine). In this section, the drums are super heavy and sound like giant hammers on metal. This song also lead to the coda section where everything comes together with the main rhythm guitar riff. This is Zeppelin best epic along with Stairway To Heaven in my opinion.

Zee PROS UND Zee HOES...
Pros - Led Zeppelin I is a thunderstorm, a firecracker, a lightning, an explosion. It pretty much changed the face of rock n roll. Listen to it if you haven't yet and your life will change.

Hoes - Both the blues covers slow down the album a bit and could have made way for different sounding soulful song like Baby Come On Home which was recorded during the sessions of Led Zepplein I. This keyboard r&b based song featuring some of the best soulful singing by Robert Plant would add to the diversity of the album.
They could have expanded both Good Times, Bad Times and Communication Breakdown to fill the unused space vacated by replacing the two blues covers by one song.

Zee CHANGES...
In - Baby Come On Home Out - You Shook Me and I Can't Quit You Baby Shorten - None Lengthen - Good Times Bad Times and Communication Breakdown Change - None

Zee GERMANS...
In my rather futile, worthless and utterly preposterous atempt to all link things good with Zee Germans, I found that the only thing German about this album is the album cover which has the picture of the once mighty Hindenburg crashing down in flames. Led Zeppelin started with this mighty monster of an album and went down in flames just like the Hindenburg.

MASTERPIECE #13 UNTITLED ALBUM LED ZEPPELIN
1
Black Dog (4:54)
2
Rock And Roll (3:40)
3
The Battle Of Evermore (5:51)
4
Stairway To Heaven (8:02)
5
Misty Mountain Hop (4:38)
6
Four Sticks (4:44)
7
Going To California (3:31)
8
When The Levee Breaks (7:07)
 

John Bonham (a.k.a. Bonzo) - drums, percussion, background vocals
John Paul Jones (a.k.a. Jonesy) - acoustic guitar, synthesizer, bass guitar, electric piano, mandolin, recorders
Jimmy Page (a.k.a. Pagey) - acoustic and electric guitar, mandolin, production
Robert Plant (a.k.a. Percy) - tambourine, lead vocals

Guests: Sandy Denny - vocals on The Battle Of Evermore and Ian Stewart - piano on Rock And Roll

Zee Legacy...
This is Led Zeppelin's most critically and commercially successful album. Many rock fans consider this one of the ultimate rock masterpieces. This album also has no title. No!!! it is NOT titled Led Zeppelin IV. Fans gave the album that name. It is also called Runes (for the mysterious runes symbols on the cover), The Fourth Album, ZoSo, and a variety of other things. Led Zeppelin had the balls to release an album with no title. They were confident that their material was very good, and that their music would speak for itself. Or may be they just didn't bother to think of a title for this? Whatever may the reasons be, this is the greatest album ever to not have a title. This album consists of Led Zeppelin's best structured/composed songs many of which (especially Black Dog, Rock and Roll, Stairway To Heaven and When The Levee Breaks) are a constant fixture on the radio. Zee Sound...
This albums continues the trend of each Led Zeppelin sounding slightly different to its predecessor. This time around Led Zeppelin go for a mixture of sounds. The self titled debut was a tightly woven mixture of heavy psychedelia and progressive blues, Led Zeppelin II was a loose bass driven hard rock and power rock concoction and Led Zeppelin III was a delicate acoustic exploration of progressive folk and progressive country. This one has it all - tight and complex metal (Black Dog, When The Levee Breaks), loose hard rock (Rock And Roll, Four Sticks), dreamy folk (A Battle Of Evermore, Going To California) and layered prog rock sounding songs (Stairway To Heaven, Misty Moutain Hop). The beauty of the album is that in spite of it constantly changing pace and style, the album never loses a step, never fails to entertain and continuously keeps the audience in awe. This album is the most song oriented album they ever made. That doesn't mean there are no usual Zeppelinesque instrumental sections and that Zeppelin started sounding pop. It just means that the album is more melodic than the previous albums.

Black Dog - Led Zeppelin began their first three albums with a bang and this is no exception. Jonesy wrote the main riff to the song that he describes as an electric-blues song with a rolling bass which turns back into itself. That's too technical a description for the DUMB me to understand but I can figure out one thing - this one is more complex than it appears to be. The song has a jaw-dropping start and stop dynamic with a capella verses alternating with music in a call and response fashion between Plant and the band. Spine-tingling is the word to describe the powerful and furious Jones, Page and Bonham's response to Plant's call. The high energy of the song raises my adrenaline level to glorious heights everytime I listen to it. I like the power, the fury and vigour in Plant's vocals when he sings "Hey hey mama said the way you move, Gon' make you sweat, gon' make you groove". At the look at it, these are not the most mature lyrics, but Zeppelin were not an intellectual band; they were an intelligent band. I don't really care for intellectuals when it comes to music. The less snobbier the better! This is my signature karaoke song apart from Whole Lotta Love. This is my wife - Nishu's favorite Zeppelin song (Zeppelin happen to be her favorite rock band as well).

Rock And Roll - This is the simplest and most straightfoward hard rocker on the album. True to its theme, the song keeps rocking and rolling away to glory. The beauty of the song is its wicked mixture of melody and power. The song is driven by a basic rock and roll drumming sequence that is amplified to monster levels by Bonzo's unbelievable dexterity. The guitar and bass on the song are simple but precise and contribute to the grooviness of the song. This is the most danceable song on the album and could have easily fit into Led Zeppelin II (if they had thought of this earlier). There is a nice faint bit of piano (rocks a lot though) towards the very end by unknown and underrated sixth Rolling Stones member Ian Stewart. I could have never figured this out if I had not looked up the credits. Thanks to the band for crediting the poor and unknown Stonesman.

The Battle Of Evermore - This song has a role reversal. For once it is Jimmy on mandolin and Jonesy on guitar. Legendary Fairport Convention/Strawbs singer, Sandy Denny does a duet with Percy on this. For the only time ever Led Zeppelin use a guest vocalist here. Sandy's (at times she sounds more masculine than Plant!) performance is nothing less than astonishing! The lyrics were inspired by Scottish folk lore and J.R.Tolkien's The Lord Of The Rings, apparently. Musically it is quite simple; there is harldy any drums on it; it is mostly Pagey and Jonesy meshing the mandolin and guitar riffs together. There is a certain kind of magic when mandolin and acoustic guitar riffs are used together in constructing a melody. Most modern bands wouldn't even think. But then, most modern bands don't have visionaries like Jones and Page, either. For her performance, Sandy got a small fifth runes symbol on the album cover - quite generous of the band, I must say. I like the song very much but I feel it is slightly more subdued and not as epic as the rest.

Stairway To Heaven - What else can be said about the most popular rock song of all time? The song that inspired a million covers and spoofs, the song that made even the hardcore Zeppelin skeptics to stop yapping for a while and take notice. This song is an epic of epic proportions. It starts off as a beautiful slow ballad before it slowly transforms into a monster hard rocker. The transition is legendary and is as smooth as any of the best pure progressive rock bands (read Yes, say Yes) of the day could pull off. The song has several sections each of which are beautifully crafted. The song begins with Pagey's acoustic guitar intro. Jonesy's recorder sneaks in without giving any notice. By the time Percy utters his first verses, Pagey and Jonesy's guitar+recorder combination picks some steam. Then there is a slight change of chords, as the guitar becomes more dramatic and recorders disappear. Piano comes in followed by electric bass. Drums kick in and by the time electric bass is in full prominence, the electric guitar starts sounding like an electric guitar. You have to hear this to see how miraculously the song transitions from one phase to another. It cannot be described in words. The final section is really dramatic as heavy drumming drives a fine Pagey solo as Percy yells "to be a rock and not to roll". Classic! I love this song as does most of the world. If you call yourself a rock fan and you haven't heard this song, you are a total dick. If you have heard this song and hate it... WELL THEN... FUCK YOU.

Misty Mountain Hop - Great... I ended the most known rock song to man with a FUCK YOU. Only a Raja can pull that off, wouldn't I? Moving over to my most favorite song on the album... Misty Moutain Top.... wait... no... Misty Moutain Hop. I wasn't joking, I was stupid enough to believe that the song is titled Misty Mountain Top... for about three years! This song is DA BOMB seriously. A lot of people think this is the weak song on the album... Fuck 'em. Featuring probably the most powerful drumming by Bonzo, this song has a curious triple attack on electric guitar, electric bass and electric piano where all the three instruments are pretty much duelling to get attention. That sorta thing gets me. The electric piano (played by Jones) riff which starts off the song is the most melodic line throughtout the sound, the electric guitar one which closely follows is like its evil twin and the funky and crunchy electric bass which gives the drum the added heavines is the responsoible big brother. The bass, guitar and piano run toghether in a fashion which reminds me of Paul Oakenfold's Ready Steady Go's video (watch it if you haven't... it is THE GREATEST VIDEO ever). Listen to this song carefully on headphones, it is the most intricate song on the album... even more than Stairway To Heaven. I also like how Plant's harmonizing (with himself) vocals on this and also love how he shifts from low pitch to high pitch often in the same verse. He truly had a remarkable sound before he lost it in late 1971. Listen to this song once again... on headphones!

Four Sticks - Welcome to the worst song on the album. It is actually a good song, but is limited in scope than the rest of the album. This song is also somewhat repetitive. It does have some interesting and complex stuff going on and is not straightforward as it seems. The song starts of like a generic hard rocker, but has a nice bass driven section in the middle and ends with some beautiful guitar and (actual) synthesizer riffs (for the first time on a Zeppelin song!) towards the end. Plant's vocals get a bit drowned here. That is another reason I don't like the song as much as the rest. Down By The Seaside (which appears in Physical Grafitti) which was recorded for this album was dropped in favour of this. I think they made a wrong decision there, that would have added to the charm of the album. I even prefer Boogie With Stu and Night Flight (both recorded during the same time) over this.

Going To California - Now this is a thing of charming beauty. This is the only song on the album which sounds acoustic (The Battle Of Evermore is acoustic as well, but feels heavy). This is the shortest song on the album, but philosophically says the deepest things. Sung with heart in honour of Joni Mitchell, whom Robert Plant admired (was was it her pussy?), this one is dreamy and gives an early morning smokey feeling. The mandolin on this is just gorgeous and leads the song and acoustic guitar gives great background support. There are supposedly some drums on the song, but I can't hear it. You don't need it for this song anyways. Any sort of fancy drum work on this might have ruined it. This is the most soulful song on the album.

When The Levee Breaks - The simple Going To California is followed by the fancy and overblown final song When The Levee Breaks. This is the most rhythmic song on the album and heavily processed in the studio. Bonzo's muffled drums were recorded in a special way. The headphones were placed above the stairwell while Bonzo played the drums downstairs. Thats why it has that distant feel to it. The harmonica which drives the song and is more prominent than the guitar or bass is processed too. Plant's vocals were also tampered with to give it that echoey sound. Zeppelin had never done this much studio tinkering before. They felt this sound reflected the plight of the people trapped in the storm that was threatening to break the levee and cause further damage. This is a great epic ending to the album. I don't like as much as you do, perhaps because it is too muffled for my taste, but I won't deny it is a great song.

Zee Songs...
I should probably just say "The album is good" and piss off, shouldn't I? Since almost every rock fan on Earth (and may be Mars... or may be the rest of the Universe?) has heard this, what is the point of reviewing it? This album, quality-wise, is as excellent as the first three Zeppelin albums. Five of the songs (Black Dog, Rock And Roll, Stairway To Heaven, Misty Mountain Hop and Going To California) would probably be on my frequently played list. The band sounds more sophisticated than on previous albums - more studio tinkering than ever. I however like my Led Zeppelin raw, fancy-schmancy not so much. I like my Led Zeppelin going bananas. I hear a lot of that on Led Zeppelin 1 and 2 where the band is in total destructive mode. This one, I feel on the whole, is more restrained and song-oriented. That explains why I have it lower than Led Zeppelin II and I. What a pompous douchebag am I? I don't like song-oriented music that much! Why did I rate it lower than Led Zeppelin's much maligned third album? I think Led Zeppelin III was a true honest effort in changing of musical direction and this is one is more of a mix of existing styles. So I think this deserves to be slightly lower. I think the first four Zeppelin albums are almost flawless. But someone had to come fourth!

Zee PROS UND Zee HOES...
Pros - There is hardly a bad song on the album. The album has a lot of variety and every song is memorable. The album as a whole is Led Zeppelin's first full blown artistic statement. And it works!

Hoes - As with the first three Zeppelin albums, I have a replacement suggestion here too. All the 8 songs sound vastly different than each other. Four Sticks is not as memorable as the rest, though. In place of The Battle Of Evermore, I would like Down By The Seaside which in my opinion is one of the best songs on Physical Graffiti which was recorded during the sessions for this album. Down By The Seaside is dominated by a smooth sounding electric piano and has a country vibe to it. I just feel that song would have added to the diversity of the album. It is also a better song than Four Sticks.

Zee CHANGES...
In - Four Sticks Out - Down By The Seaside Shorten - None Lengthen - None Change - None

Zee GERMANS...
In my rather futile, worthless and utterly preposterous atempt to all link things good with Zee Germans, I found that the only thing German about this album is (again!) the album cover. The lovely front cover has nothing German about it, just an older farmer (possibly British since he looks so sad) carrying a bunch of sticks; the back cover however has one runes symbol each for each member. If you don't know - runes are the letter of ancient Germanic languages. Runes symbols were also used during 18th century Viking revival, Scandinvanian Gothicism and Germanic occulticism in the 19th century and Germanic neo-paganism in the 20th century.

MASTERPIECE #13 FRAGILE YES
1
Roundabout (8:30)
2
Cans And Brahms (1:38)
3
We Have Heaven (1:40)
4
South Side Of The Sky (8:02)
5
Five Percent For Nothing (0:35)
6
Long Distance Runaround (3:30)
7
The Fish (2:39)
8
Mood For A Day (3:00)
9
Heart Of The Sunrise (11:27)
 

Jon Anderson - lead vocals
Bill Bruford - drums, percussion
Steve Howe
- electric, steel string acoustic and nylon string guitar, backing vocals
Chris Squire - electric bass guitar, backing vocals
Rick Wakeman - mellotron, organ, piano, synthesizer, harpsichord

Zee Legacy...
Fragile is usually considered Yes best or second best. Mainstream critics probably consider this the best prog album (if Floyd is not prog). Prog critics usually consider it one of the best. This made Yes even more popular. And Yes were almost on par with Led Zeppelin in terms of a concert attraction those days. This and their next album Close To The Edge represents the glory days of prog. Many bands including Led Zeppelin, Jethro Tull, Pink Floyd, Queen and Who would take a dive into prog because of the success of this album.

Zee Sound...
This is my favorite lineup. This has JonGOD on vocals, BruGOD on drums, SteveGOD on guitars, ChrisGOD on bass and WakeGod on 1000 different types of keyboards. No other line up was this strong except Led Zeppelin. Deep Purple's best line up had Roger Glover, whose contribution did not match the rest. Rush had Geddy Lee as the weak link with respect to vocals.I I think the same about other power trios like Cream, ELP and Jimi Hendrix Experience. Mahavishnu Orchestra (and other jazz fusion bands) had no vocalist. King Crimson best line up on their debut was strong, but I never considered Lake as an excellent vocalist. Led Zeppelin and Yes had it, excellent singer, excellent guitarist, excellent bassist, excellent keyboardist and an excellent drummer. But Zeppelin had only four GODs, Yes had five. So round one to Yes ;-) But Led Zeppelin lasted with that lineup till the end. Yes unfortunately lasted only couple albums with this lineup :(. So round 2 and 3 to Led Zeppelin. With addition of Wakeman, Yes become all virtuoso and suddenly made a shift to classical based rock. Wakeman is highly influenced by classical composers and he brought his array of keyboards to the mix. Howe decided he know longer wanted to sound like a traditional rock guitarist and made a move to classical guitar. And even Bruford has decided here he needed to sound more jazz fusionesque. Now Yes sound really exotic. This album was recorded ten months after The Yes Album and sounds radically different. No longer are they are sounding like the other Led Zeppelin (with jazz influences instead of blues), they are now sounding like the one and only Yes. Yes are slowly entering their own cosmic and heavenly sublime territory and no longer sounding like classic rock.

Zee Songs...
This is one of the most perfectly executed and recorded albums of all time. Only The Dark Side Of The Moon rivals this in terms of how carefully the sound is created here. Yet, I don't think this can top Close To The Edge. This is firmly prog rock unlike The Yes Album, but Close To The Edge is way more ambitious and yet as successful as this one. This has nine songs, four of which are longs and five of each are solo contributions by the five GODs. Every solo contribution is good, but the ones that shine the most are Wakeman's and Howe's. Squire's Fish is very good, but a bit nerdy and sounds like a math project in exercise. Anderson's and Bruford's contributions are way too short and fail to make a long lasting impression. Too short but sweet. May be they should have chopped some minutes of South Side Of The Sky which is the least smooth flowing of the epics and given more time for the solo contributions. I don't know, the whole thing is squeezed in air tight. May be a double album would have been a better solution here. This is just nitpicking by the way. I really have no major issue with this album. It's just the albums above this are slightly better (in terms of artistic success) overall in my opinion. This is somewhat of a rushed album, I think. They didn't have enough material, so they added the solo material which was most likely already pre-conceived by the band members much before this album. Fragile in my opinion is the most varied Yes album, just like how Houses Of The Holy is. But it suffers from the same minor issue. Too much variety that in my opinion compromised the flow of the album somewhat. Fragile scored 9.90 out of 10.

Zee PROS UND Zee HOES...
Pros - The addition of Rick Wakeman brings Yes to full strength. With Wakeman bringing in his classical influences and Steve Howe switching over to a more organic flamenco/classical style, the band has left behind their straightforward rocking style of their previous albums and more into complex prog territory.

Hoes - May be they should have shortened South Side Of The Sky, the least memorable of the three epics on the album and given more time to the solo contributions especially Anderson's and Brufords which are way too short.

Zee CHANGES...
In - None Out - None Shorten - South Side Of The Sky Lengthen - We Have Heaven and Five Cent For Nothing Change - The Fish could have had more instruments

MASTERPIECE #15 IN THE LAND OF GREY AND PINK CARAVAN
1
Golf Girl (5:05)
2
Winter Wine (7:46)
3
Love To Love You (3:06)
4
In The Land Of Grey And Pink (4:51)
5
Nine Feet Underground (22:43)
 
 
Richard Coughlan – drums
Pye Hastings – guitar, lead vocals
David Sinclair – organ, electric piano, mellotron
Richard Sinclair – bass guitar, acoustic guitar, vocals
Guest:
Jimmy Hastings - piccolo, flute, saxophone
Paul Beecham - trombone
Dave Grinstead - cannon, bell and wind
MASTERPIECE #16 WE KEEP ON EMBRYO
1
Abdul Malek (3:18)
2
Don't Come Tomorrow (3:51)
3
Ehna, Ehna, Abu Lele (8:46)
4
Hackbrett-Dance (3:59)
5
No Place To Go (12:30)
6
Flute And Saz (6:04)
 
 
 
Roman Bunka - electric guitar, saxophone, electric bass guitar, percussion, lead vocals
Christian Burchard - drums, percusion, marimba, vibes, hackbrett, mellotron, lead vocals
Charlie Mariano
- alto and soprano saxophones, flute, nagaswaram, bamboo flute
Dieter Miekautsch - piano, electric piano, bass piano on the clavinet
MASTERPIECE #17 L'APOCALYPSE DES ANIMAUX VANGELIS
1
Apocalypse Des Animaux (1:26)
2
La Petite Fille De La Mer (5:54)
3
Le Singe Bleu (7:39)
4
La Petite Fille De La Mer (5:54)
5
La Mort Du Loup (3:03)
6
L'ours Musicien(1:03)
7
Creation Du Monde (10:03)
8
La Mer Recommencee (5:56)
 
 
 
Vangelis - keyboards
MASTERPIECE #18 FUTURE DAYS CAN
1
Future Days (9:30)
2
Spray (8:29)
3
Moonshake (3:04)
4
Bel Air (20:00)
 
 
 
 

Holger Czukay - electric bass guitar, double bass
Michael Karoli - electric guitar, violin
Jaki Liebezeit
- drums, percussion
Irmin Schmidt - synthesizers, keyboards
Damo Suzuki - lead vocals, percussion

Zee Legacy...
This is considered the best krautrock (whatever the fuck that means) albums of all time. This is definitely the best prog album to come out of Germany. Alternative and indie rock fans love it because it is so unconventional and it is also massively influencial TO THEM. Fucking asshole indie/alternative rock fan! Anything which is not commercially successful is GOLD for them. But I digress. This one was not commercially successful yet GOOD. A rare combination... the same could not be send of the all the crap 80s, 90s and 00s albums that have been influenced by this album. But it is not Can's fault that clueless snobby indie rockers worship them. This album is one of the rare experimental albums which almost knowns. Okay, tin-eared mainstream rock critics might not have not heard this album, but would have definitely at least heard of this album and this band. Can have a great reputation. And they rightly deserves it.

Zee Sound...
Can were the weirdest of the prog bands. They were so weird, some don't even consider them prog. Well, if you are playing complicated and technically skilled stuff and on top of that you have 20 minute epics (three of them on this album), you are being ultra-ambitious and you are prog. In fact Can are one of the finest prog bands ever - better than Genesis and King Crimson who seem to get a lot of prog hype. Genesis could hardly ever rock and King Crimson could hardly ever write a memorable song; Can could do both very well. And they were consistent in doing that. They just happen to be German and they happen to be rather inaccessible. In fact I consider them less inaccessible than even Van Der Graaf Generator (who really wrote lot of straightforward stuff if you are paying attention). Can hardly ever wrote anything simple. They were proggers of the proggers ;-) One funny thing I noticed is that in my four holy trinities here, during the 1967-78 period, the band at the top is the most accessible and the band at the bottom of the trinity is the least accessible (Led Zeppelin>Deep Purple> Black Sabbath, Yes >VDGG>Can, Pink Floyd>Popol Vuh>Kraftwerk, and Hawkwind>Aphrodite's Child>Mahavishnu Orchestra in terms of accessibility). Can played jazz music with rock instruments. Thats the way to put it. Their sound is a mix of jazz, avant-garde, rock, classical, funk, and trance. Liebezeit was the jazz guy, Schmidt was the classical/electronic/trance guy, Czukay was the funk guy, Karoli was more rock and Suzuki lead them into avantgarde. The presence of different personalities with different backgrounds (just like for Led Zeppelin, Yes and VDGG) led to the progressive nature of their sound. This is by far their least accessible and most experimental album. This is their only double album and this gave them the freedom to do as much experimentation as possible. Truly unique and at times scary. Side 3 and 4 in my opinion drops the quality of the album down a notch. Yes, the experimentation and overall wackiness of both the sides are endearing but it does not have the similar effect as Side 1 and Side 2 which are perfect in my opinion. This would have been a perfect single album. But either way, this is still an excellent album and with a score of 9.96 out of 10 and a rank of 15th is, among the very best albums of all time.

Zee Songs...
Double albums are hardly perfect. But this is almost there. The first three songs are the best, they are the most accessible and also the most memorable. The fourth song is a fabulous jam. The fifth and sixth are really bizarre and very enjoyable. The last song the most accessible is in fact the worst (but by no means bad) one. I think this album could have been higher if the albums above it were not better. It was hard for me to put this at 17 but thats how the calculations turned out. May be if they had some other more interesting song as their final song, this could have been higher.

Zee PROS UND Zee HOES...
Pros - The most ambitious and experimental rock album to come out of Germany. This double album is one of the few double albums to be almost flawless. This is the highest (studio) double album on the list.

Hoes - The only pop oriented song on the album - the final song Bring Me Coffee or Tea has the least impact on the album. Since the song is the final song on the album, it is somewhat of an anticlimax. Shouldn't they have ended the album with the wackiest thing they could ever imagine?

MASTERPIECE #1 AUTOBAHN KRAFTWERK
1
Autobahn (22:43)
2
Kometenmelodie 1 (6:26)
3
Kometenmelodie 2 (5:48)
3
Mitternacht (3:43)
4
Morgenspaziergang (4:04)
 
 
 

Wolfgang Flur - percussion
Ralf Hutter - lead vocals, electronics, synthesizer, organ, piano, guitar, electronic drums
Klaus Roder
- electric violin
Florian Schneider - lead vocals, vocoder, electronics, synthesizer, flute, electronic drums

Zee Legacy...
This is the album which introduced German experimental rock to the world. The title song in a heavily truncated form became a world wide hit. Many casual classic rock and prog rock fans had no clue about the German experimental rock scene which had been hyperactive ever since 1967. Turns out Americans and rest of the world got wind of this phenomenon in the last great year for both prog rock and krautrock in general. Yes, this last and Yes liver performance from 1974 are the last recorded album on the list. After this year both prog rock and krautrock would die a premature death. Led Zeppelin would enter into decadence, Yes would take an extended break and never be the same when would be come back in 1977, Pink Floyd would sound less experimental and more money hungry mainstream, courtesy band infighting and overall greed, Hawkwind would lose key members like Michael Davies and Ian Kilmister and would no longer be the same and Can would lose their leader Damo Suzuki and would never sound the same. Oddly Kraftwerk would begin their most successful yet groundbreaking phase as electronic pop pioneers only after this album. But that is a different thing. Here they are not pop, here they are rock, krautrock that is. There are still non-synthetic instruments like guitar, electric violin, flute, organ and piano on this album. Though technically not pure krautrock, this is the most important album to come out of Germany apart from Can's avantgarde masterpiece Tago Mago, Can's ambient masterpiece Future Days and Tangerine Dream's trance masterpiece Phaedra. This is the most influencial of all the four albums, primarily because it is the most accessible of the four.

Zee Sound...
Ah! the sound. This is hard to describe the sound. It has a certain melodic aspect to it, it is dreamy, radiant yet dark, and warm yet detached feel to it. In short it is German. It has ambient aspects to it, but it is also beat oriented trance. Technologically advanced and miles ahead of the output from their British peers, this album was something new for 1974. Jazz fans go ga-ga over Miles Davis and Herbie Hancock were doing in the late sixties and seventies, but their innovations were still based on a basic jazz sound. Even Can's avantgarde excursions were rooted in the jam scene. This one really has no basis. Only the introverted secluded Kraftwerk members could pull this one out and make it work. Nothing that came before sounded remotely like this. This is the Close To The Ege that came from Germany. Well, not as perfect but really in terms of scope and imagination this one destroys almost everything that came out of Germany and pretty much the rest of the world. Okay Phaedra did come out a year before and that was on another level of hyperactive imagination probably even more than this. But it didn't have so many aspects to the sound as this did. This album overall has more scope to it than the Can and Tangerine Dream masterpieces on the list. Another great thing about this album is though it has 4 songs only all of them sound drastically different than each other. Autobahn is a somewhat futuristic but in the clouds serene kind of song. You get the feel that you are on a heavenly ride. Kometenmelodie as the name suggest has a feeling of travel through space. The first part of it is dark and industrial and the second part is dancey and somewhat. Mitternacht is the lightest and lullaby kind of song on the album. The final song Morgenspaziergang gives a early morning feel to the song. One can imagine that this is a concept album about someone who went for a long drive in the evening and then was gazed through the stars in the night before falling asleep and then waking up lazily in morning with a pleasant weather and hearing the sounds of bird chirping.

Zee Songs...
The album scored 9.93 out of 10 on my scale which is high enough for it to be 6th. I think this album is close to being flawless just like the 5 albums above it. But it is not flawless courtesy Mitternacht which doesn't have the same bite as the rest of the songs. I think that song was not really needed and they could have explored Morgenspaziergang a little more.

Pros - One of the most important electronic recordings to come out of Germany. This album straddles the fine line between minimalism and maximimalism in the sense that it is both techno and trance and also if you consider it in the rock context both protopunk and progressive rock. It is really either entirely electronic nor entirely rock. So that make it a curious addition to the list. And also a landmark breakthrough for rock and electronic music in general.

Hoes - The only pop oriented song on the album - the final song Bring Me Coffee or Tea has the least impact on the album. Since the song is the final song on the album, it is somewhat of an anticlimax. Shouldn't they have ended the album with the wackiest thing they could ever imagine?

MASTERPIECE #1 TAGO MAGO CAN
1
Paperhouse (7:28)
2
Mushroom (4:03)
3
Oh Yeah (7:23)
4
Halleluhwah (18:32)
5
Aumgn (17:37)
6
Peking O (11:37)
7
Bring Me Coffee Or Tea (6:47)
 
 

Holger Czukay - electric bass guitar, engineering, editing
Michael Karoli - electric guitar, violin
Jaki Liebezeit
- drums, double bass, piano
Irmin Schmidt - keyboards, lead vocals
Damo Suzuki - lead vocals, percussion

Zee Legacy...
This is considered the best krautrock (whatever the fuck that means) albums of all time. This is definitely the best prog album to come out of Germany. Alternative and indie rock fans love it because it is so unconventional and it is also massively influencial TO THEM. Fucking asshole indie/alternative rock fan! Anything which is not commercially successful is GOLD for them. But I digress. This one was not commercially successful yet GOOD. A rare combination... the same could not be send of the all the crap 80s, 90s and 00s albums that have been influenced by this album. But it is not Can's fault that clueless snobby indie rockers worship them. This album is one of the rare experimental albums which almost knowns. Okay, tin-eared mainstream rock critics might not have not heard this album, but would have definitely at least heard of this album and this band. Can have a great reputation. And they rightly deserves it.

Zee Sound....
Can were the weirdest of the prog bands. They were so weird, some don't even consider them prog. Well, if you are playing complicated and technically skilled stuff and on top of that you have 20 minute epics (three of them on this album), you are being ultra-ambitious and you are prog. In fact Can are one of the finest prog bands ever - better than Genesis and King Crimson who seem to get a lot of prog hype. Genesis could hardly ever rock and King Crimson could hardly ever write a memorable song; Can could do both very well. And they were consistent in doing that. They just happen to be German and they happen to be rather inaccessible. In fact I consider them less inaccessible than even Van Der Graaf Generator (who really wrote lot of straightforward stuff if you are paying attention). Can hardly ever wrote anything simple. They were proggers of the proggers ;-) One funny thing I noticed is that in my four holy trinities here, during the 1967-78 period, the band at the top is the most accessible and the band at the bottom of the trinity is the least accessible (Led Zeppelin>Deep Purple> Black Sabbath, Yes >VDGG>Can, Pink Floyd>Popol Vuh>Kraftwerk, and Hawkwind>Aphrodite's Child>Mahavishnu Orchestra in terms of accessibility). Can played jazz music with rock instruments. Thats the way to put it. Their sound is a mix of jazz, avant-garde, rock, classical, funk, and trance. Liebezeit was the jazz guy, Schmidt was the classical/electronic/trance guy, Czukay was the funk guy, Karoli was more rock and Suzuki lead them into avantgarde. The presence of different personalities with different backgrounds (just like for Led Zeppelin, Yes and VDGG) led to the progressive nature of their sound. This is by far their least accessible and most experimental album. This is their only double album and this gave them the freedom to do as much experimentation as possible. Truly unique and at times scary. Side 3 and 4 in my opinion drops the quality of the album down a notch. Yes, the experimentation and overall wackiness of both the sides are endearing but it does not have the similar effect as Side 1 and Side 2 which are perfect in my opinion. This would have been a perfect single album. But either way, this is still an excellent album and with a score of 9.96 out of 10 and a rank of 15th is, among the very best albums of all time.

Zee Songs...
Double albums are hardly perfect. But this is almost there. The first three songs are the best, they are the most accessible and also the most memorable. The fourth song is a fabulous jam. The fifth and sixth are really bizarre and very enjoyable. The last song the most accessible is in fact the worst (but by no means bad) one. I think this album could have been higher if the albums above it were not better. It was hard for me to put this at 17 but thats how the calculations turned out. May be if they had some other more interesting song as their final song, this could have been higher.

Zee PROS UND Zee HOES...
Pros - The most ambitious and experimental rock album to come out of Germany. This double album is one of the few double albums to be almost flawless. This is the highest (studio) double album on the list.

Hoes - The only pop oriented song on the album - the final song Bring Me Coffee or Tea has the least impact on the album. Since the song is the final song on the album, it is somewhat of an anticlimax. Shouldn't they have ended the album with the wackiest thing they could ever imagine?

MASTERPIECE #21 LED ZEPPELIN III LED ZEPPELIN
1
Immigrant Song (2:26)
2
Friends (3:55)
3
Celebration Day (3:29)
4
Since I've Been Loving You (7:25)
5
Out On The Tiles (4:04)
6
Gallows Pole (4:58)
7
Tangerine (3:12)
8
That's The Way (5:38)
9
Bron-Y-Aur-Stomp (4:20)
10
Hats Off To Roy Harper (3:41)

John Bonham (a.k.a. Bonzo) - drums, percussion, spoons, castanets, backing vocals,
John Paul Jones (a.k.a. Jonesy) - electric bass guitar, organ, synthesizer, mandolin, acoustic five string fretless bass, backing vocals
Jimmy Page (a.k.a. Pagey) - acoustic, electric, twelve-string, slide and pedal steel guitar, banjo, dulcimer, backing vocals, production
Robert Plant (a.k.a. Percy) - harmonica, lead vocals

Zee Legacy...
While Led Zeppelin II sounded quite (looser and more danceable) different than Led Zeppelin I, Led Zeppelin III sounded much much different than the first two albums. I think the Zeps were paying attention to what was going on in the hard rock/heavy metal world. Black Sabbath's debut and Deep Purple in Rock were released after Led Zeppelin I an II and both the bands had taken the Led Zeppelin prototype of heaviness and took it to another level of heaviness and loudness. Led Zeppelin did not want to counter them by releasing a even heavier album and be stereotyped as primarily a heavy band just like the other two. That would not be so smart. Why follow the followers? So they went in for a more acoustic psychedelic folk sound that is in complete contrast to what their image was. This also could have been a reaction against the press who were slagging Led Zeppelin as a one-trick pony. Whatever it was, it was a smart move in my opinion. It changed the opinion of critics and fans about this band. No longer they were just a loud band who extended and amplified the blues. Now people would associate them with folk music, country music and progressive rock as well. Led Zeppelin III, because of its shocking change in sound did not sell well as the first two albums. Was it too much of a shock to the core audience? The press once again found a way to criticize them saying that they following the trend of Crosby Stills Nash, though this is by far heavier, in your face and quite unlike anything from the folk rock movement. My another theory as to why Led Zeppelin chose this sound is that both Page and Plant chose to record this album during their time off, in the rural setting of Bron-Yr-Aur. And left the other two heavy members behind and composed most of the material without them. So the heavy aspect is slightly lower and Plant's (in particular) folkier side is revealed. It doesn't matter whether any of my theories are right. Plant, Page, Jones and Bonham did something drastic with their sound on this album and it worked! In spite of the initial criticisms, this album is regarded as a classic nowadays. I think it is another near-perfect album by the Zeps and deserves to be rated higher by the public than it is (even as of now).

Zee Sound...
The album has ten songs out of which five (Friends, Tangerine, That's The Way, Bron-Y-Aur Stomp and Hats Off To Roy Harper) are acoustic. The rest are heavy metal (Immigrant Song), unclassifiable trance-metal (Celebration Day), hard rock (Out On The Tiles), blues rock (Since I've Been Loving You) and heavy country/folk rock (Gallows Pole). Led Zeppelin I and II had acoustic material too but this album had more of them. But don't mistake it for normal folk rock. These acoustic songs are not entirely acoustic and still have a Zeppelin heaviness to it. The major difference between this album and the albums preceding this, is the use of more exotic (for heavy metal) instruments like dulcimer, pedal steel guitar, banjo and mandolin. Led Zeppelin I and II were electric bass guitar heavy. This album finds John Paul Jones branching out. He plays bass pedal and organ on Since I've Been Loving You, mandolin on That's The Way five string acoustic fretless bass on Bron-Yr-Aur Stomp. Page also diversifies using different acoustic guitars and playing dulcimer and bass guitar on That's The Way and banjo on Gallows Pole. This is by far the most exotic Zeppelin album. This album was a real progression of their sound.

Zee Songs...

Zee PROS UND Zee HOES...
Pros - Led Zeppelin's most acoustic venture. This is not Zeppelin going soft; this is Zeppelin going artistic. This might be the first Led Zeppelin album progressive rock fans liked (although ironically Led Zeppelin I was the most progressive they ever got). This album is one of the most charming albums and deserves more respect that it gets.

Hoes - Need more mandolin!!! Need to get rid of the not so exotic songs like Friends and Out On The Tiles and replace them with atypical Zeppelin songs like Hey Hey What Can I Do (mandolin, zither) and the acoustic guitar piece Bron Yr Aur. Also Immigrant Song could have been longer. I still love the song and think it is perfect, but I am greedy and want more of it.

Zee CHANGES...
In - Hey Hey What Can I Do and Poor Tom Out - Friends and Out On The Tiles Shorten - None Lengthen - Immigrant Song Change - None

Zee GERMANS...
In my rather futile, worthless and utterly preposterous atempt to all link things good with Zee Germans, I found that the only thing German about this album is (again!) the album cover. The album not only has the Hindenburg but also has images of objects that would be used to build one. This album cover notably has an innovative and interesting use of a volvelle.

MASTERPIECE #22 THE YES ALBUM YES
1
Yours Is No Disgrace (9:41)
2
Clap (3:17)
3
Starship Trooper (9:25)
4
I've Seen All Good People (6:56)
5
A Venture (3:18)
6
Perpetual Change (8:54)
 
 
 

Jon Anderson - lead vocals
Bill Bruford - drums, percussion
Steve Howe
- portuguese, electric and acoustic guitar, backing vocals
Tony Kaye - organ, piano, synthesizer
Chris Squire - electric bass guitar, backing vocals
Guests: Colin Goldring - recorders on I've Seen All Good People


Zee Legacy...
The Yes album is considered one of the finest Yes albums ever made. Mainstream rock crtics love it and consider it second best or third best. Some might consider it the best (if they do not love the more complex music they made later on). Prog fans consider this more of a transitional album (but nevertheless a very good one) and not prog enough. So you will find this as either 5th or 6th best Yes album on prog lists. This album spawned at least three hits in the form of Yours Is No Disgrace, Starship Trooper and I've Seen All Good People. This took not just Yes but progressive rock to the mainstream. This is was released in 1971, the first big year for mainstream prog. Consisting of four longs and two 3 minuters which merely act as fillers, this album is a big progressive evolutionary jump for Yes and the prog rock world in general. Recorded in this is among the very first full fledged prog rock albums. There were only few full fledged prog rock albums before 1971 that got any mainstream attention. This album broke new grounds for prog rock. Zee Sound...
The best album Led Zeppelin never made. Just listen to I've Seen All Good People and Starship Trooper and tell me that it does not sound like something Led Zeppelin could make. The drums are tribal with Bonham, the guitar is bluesy and melodic like Page, the bass is heavy like Jonesy and of course the vocals are like Plant only slightly more effiminate. This is Yes most Zeppelin like sound and most classic rock like sound. The only other album where they sounded classic rock was their first album Yes but that had jazzy overtones. This one is slightly less jazzier and more straightforward but with tricky (but not very complex) transitions. This might be the most enjoyable Yes album, because this is their most groovy (just like Led Zeppelin II is for Led Zeppelin and Hawkwind is for Hawkwind). With Steve Howe in place of Peter Banks, the band make a deeper dive into prog. On their second album, they made a big mistake of employing an orchestra which pissed off their then guitarist Peter Banks. This time, they make no such mistake. Their new lead guitarist is more talented and versatile than their earlier guitarist and is also an excellent songwriter. So Time And And Word's misstep was a blessing in disguise. This album has four epics Yours Is No Disgrace, Starship Trooper, I've Seen All Good People and Perpetual Change which have progressive tendencies but are nevertheless quite straightforward and rock (unlike the epics on other albums like Fragile, Close To The Edge and Relayer). All the four epics sound vastly different from each other. Starship Trooper is more classic rock than the rest with a brilliant bluesy guitar solo towards solo towards the end. Perpetual Change is keyboard lead and sounds somewhat closer to their latter sound. I've Seen All Good is a folk pop song converted to progressive rock. And Yours Is No Disgrace is somewhat of a mix of both classic rock and progressive leaning rock. Note I say progressive leaning rock, because I do not think this is quite the complicated sound of their following albums. This album has loads of versatility and has loads of hooks and melodies to make it thoroughly enjoyable. If this is prog, this is one of the most danceable prog albums ever made.

Zee Songs...
I consider this album near perfect. I can't find many faults here. Some minor nitpickings are the four longer songs overshadow the two shorter ones - Clap and Venture. Those two songs are very good and cute, but not sexy enough. Probably they should have gone all out and released the album with extended version of the four songs and reserved Clap and Venture for the following albums. I had to rank this album below Close To The Edge because well, Close To The Edge is on the edges of perfection, this isn't. The Yes Album scored 9.87 out of 10 and solidly rounded up the top 10.

Zee PROS UND Zee HOES...
Pros - Yes' first commercially successful album. This was also their boldest and dynamic album so far with this new hot shot guitarist called Steve Howe in the mix. This is the beginning of mainstream prog rock.

Hoes - The Clap is cute and The Venture has some nice bits. But both are rather unecessary in my opinion.

Zee CHANGES...
In - None Out - The Clap, The Venture Shorten - None Lengthen - Starship Trooper, Perpetual Change Change - None

MASTERPIECE #23 FOR YOUR PLEASURE ROXY MUSIC
1
Do The Strand (4:04)
2
Beauty Queen (4:41)
3
Strictly Confidential (3:48)
4
Editions Of You (3:51)
5
In Every Dream Home A Heartache (5:29)
6
The Bogus Man (9:20)
7
Grey Lagoons (4:13)
8
For Your Pleasure (6:51)
 

Brian Eno – VCS3 synthesizer, backing vocals
Bryan Ferry – vocals, piano, pianet, mellotron, harmonica
Andy Mackay – oboe, saxophone, organ
Phil Manzanera – electric guitar
Graham Simpson – bass guitar
Paul Thompson – drums

Zee Legacy...
....

Zee Sound...
....

Zee Songs...

Zee PROS UND Zee HOES...
Pros - ...

Hoes - ...

MASTERPIECE #24 LED ZEPPELIN II LED ZEPPELIN
1
Whole Lotta Love (5:34)
2
What Is and What Should Never Be (4:47)
3
The Lemon Song (6:20)
4
Thank You (4:47)
5
Heartbreaker (4:15)
6
Living Loving Maid (2:40)
7
Ramble On (4:35)
8
Moby Dick (4:25)
9
Bring It On Home (4:19)
   

John Bonham (a.k.a. Bonzo) - drums, timpani, backing vocals,
John Paul Jones (a.k.a. Jonesy) - electric bass guitar, organ
Jimmy Page (a.k.a. Pagey) - acoustic and electric guitar, theremin, backing vocals, production
Robert Plant (a.k.a. Percy) - harmonica, lead vocals

Zee Legacy...
This is stripped down Led Zeppelin. There is no raga rock (Black Mountain Side), folk rock (Babe I'm Gonna Leave You), psychedelic rock (Dazed And Confused) here like on Led Zeppelin I. There are no punk oriented songs (Communication Breakdown) or complex bolero rhythm inspired songs (How Many More Times) like on Led Zeppelin I either. This is pure gut-busting hard rock. Well... not entirely, there is some exotic jazz-funk-blues fusion on The Lemon Song, blues ballad flavoring of Thank You, uncategorizable alternating folk-hard rock on Ramble On and tinge of psychedelia on both Whole Lotta Love and What Is And What Should Never Be. The rest is pure blues inspired hard rock (Hearbreaker, Living Lovin Maid, Moby Dick and Bring It On Home). So it almost 50% pure hard rock. You would not get this on any of their other five classic studio albums. This album launched hard rock and heavy metal in a big way. The bands that followed imitated the guitar and bass riffs on the album, the loud drums and the wailing vocals on Led Zeppelin II. Led Zeppelin II set the standards for all kinds of groove oriented party rock. Led Zeppelin II is actually the most enjoyable Led Zeppelin album since it is the grooviest (and least progressive) of the first six Led Zeppelin classics. The funk influenced bass and drums give this album a solid rhythm which makes it one of the most danceable hard rock albums of all time. Led Zeppelin I is somewhat of a sinister cousin to this. This one is looser and more jovial.

Zee Sound...
Though all their albums have the Led Zeppelin sound to them, Led Zeppelin always managed to give each album its own feel. Unlike Led Zeppelin I, which was recorded in studio in a mere 36 hours, this one took a lot more time. It was recorded on the road (between January-August 1969), when Led Zeppelin were touring. Since it was recorded in several studios and since Page knew that every studio will have its own ambience, he decided to not dabble into capturing studio ambience and repeat the lightning in a bottle feel of Led Zeppelin I. So this one is quite different in sound, in spite of it being blues based and heavy just like Led Zeppelin I. The bass on this album is faster and more complicated and pretty much dominates the proceedings. John Paul Jones is on fire here. He hardly plays organ here - except on Thank You and he does not play electric piano at all. He throws in all his influences (jazz, blues, funk) into his bass playing here. Plant's vocals are still strong and he screams away in the power section of songs and gives some of his most soulful performances in the delicate section of the songs. Bonham plays incredibly well here just like the debut. Page shows a lot of restraint here (more so than Led Zeppelin I). He is also at his most melodic. The band once again hit the bull's eye.

Zee Songs...
Whole Lotta Love The motorbike riff song. This is one the most powerful songs ever recorded by Led Zeppelin. And one of their most metal like songs apart from Good Times Bad Times, Immigrant Song and Black Dog. Its no coincidence all four songs were opening songs for their first four albums. Zeppelin started their albums with a bang. This one is no exception to the rule.

Zee PROS UND Zee HOES...
Pros - Led Zeppelin II is the best hard rock attempt ever by any band. It is also one of the grooviest album ever (at least in the hard rock world). I enjoy this album the most. This is my favorite workout album along with Space Ritual and Hawkwind's debut.

Hoes - The weakest song on the album is undoubtedly the instrumental Moby Dick which does not showcase John Bonzo's percussion and drumming skills as it should have. This song works ideally only in the live setting and in my opinion can be replaced by Jimmy Page's instrumental solo effort White Summer which is one of the best raga rock songs ever. They could also add Travelling Riverside Blues which is in my opinion their greatest blues rock song ever. That song was recorded and performed live for BBC just months before the album was released.

Zee CHANGES...
In - White Summer and Travelling Riverside Blues Out - Moby Dick Shorten - None Lengthen - Whole Lotta Love Change - None

Zee GERMANS...
In my rather futile, worthless and utterly preposterous atempt to all link things good with Zee Germans, I found that the only thing German about this album is (again!) the album cover. The album cover once again has the Hindenburg (this time in white instead of black) and has a image of a German WW1 air force whose faces were airbrushed out with the faces of Zeppelin members, Zeppelin manager Peter Grant, tour manager Richard Cole, Glynis Johns - mother of Mary Poppins and Blind Wilie Johnson.

MASTERPIECE #25 YES YES
1
Beyond and Before (4:58)
2
I See You (6:54)
3
Yesterday And Today (2:53)
4
Looking Around (4:05)
5
Harold Land (5:45)
6
Every Little Thing (5:46)
7
Sweetness (4:35)
8
Survival (6:23)
 

Jon Anderson - percussion, lead vocals
Peter Banks
- electric and acoustic guitar, backing vocals
Bill Bruford
- drums, percussion
Tony Kaye - organ, piano
Chris Squire - electric bass guitar, backing vocals

Zee Legacy...
This is Yes' first album. They had a different sound back then. And a different lineup with Peter Banks as guitarist and Tony Kaye as the keyboard player along with the core members Jon Anderson, Chris Squire and Bill Bruford. All of them came from psychedelic bands, so this album has a sort of psychedelic-prog sound with somewhat pop leanings. Chris Squire and Jon Anderson had an idea of mixing the melodies of Beatles with the virtuosity of Cream. This album was massively successful in that regard. The album was not comercially successful though. It is supposed to be have been overshadowed by the release of Led Zeppelin I that year which was a lot more commercially successful. Prog fans do not rate this high. Since Yes is known as a prog band, this album (and the next slightly more prog but still psychedelic album Time And A Word) has slipped under the radar, even among classic rock critics. However, there are a few lovers of late 60s pyschedelia who love this album very much. I am one of them. I can understand the overlooking of Time And The Word their sophomore attempt which is really destroyed by the intruding orchestra, but I cannot understand why this album is underrated. There are hardly any flaws in this album, it rocks and has many memorable songs. Perhaps its the age old problem of bands having their earlier commercially unsuccessful sound ignored by the core fans. When the band's core base does not support an album, chances are high that professional critics would not budge. This album shares the same misfortune. Sort of like Hawkwind's debut. Ignored, but really should not be!

Zee Sound...
The sound here is a mix of psychedelic rock with jazz, hard rock and folk and a tinge of early prog. There are two straightforward hard rock numbers (Beyond And Before and Looking Around). There are two covers (I See You and Every Little Thing) which are frantic jazzy workouts that blow away the originals to smithereens. There are two folk oriented songs (Yesterday and Today and Sweetness). And then are two prog rock songs (Harold Land and Survival). Peter Banks was more jazzy than his eventual successor, the more classical sounding Steve Howe. Bill Bruford was primarily a jazz drummer. So this album is more jazz based than latter albums. Tony Kaye plays piano and organ in a psychedelic way similar to Rick Wright of Pink Floyd but faster and less freakishly. Chris Squire is not as dominating as usual but gives some solid rhythm and some decent leads. Jon Anderson sings in a slightly different accent. All in all, this sounds highly unlike Yes of latter days and is a charming album. Since I love most of the songs on it and love the performances of the band, I think this is a unsung masterpiece, which deserves much more recognition than it gets.

Zee Songs...
Flow - This album believe it or not flows very well even though it is has diverse selection of hard rock (Beyond And Before), folk rock (Yesterday And Today, Sweetness), psychedelic rock (I See You and Every Little Thing) and progressive rock (Harold Land and Survival). I give it a 10/10 more than what I gave for the more respected Floyd and Zeppelin debut's album.

Shockingness - Okay this kind of music was not done before. A mix of jazz with psychedelic hard rock and folk rock sounds. But this album, I have to admit is not as shocking as Floyd and Zeppelin debut, particularly considering that it was recorded as late as 1969. This could have been more progressive in my opinion. Hence it only gets a 9.90/10 for shockingness

Selection - I don't think they had any other better choices at this point. I wouldn't throw out any song because they are all good and very memorable (if you bother to listen to them multiple times). I would reduce the length of the songs I like the least (Harold Land and Sweetness) and increase the length of the songs I like the most (Looking Around and Survival. Since I can find two songs are being somewhat weaker than the rest, I can give this album only 9.95.

Instrumentation - Though Peter Banks is no Steve Howe and Tony Kaye is no Rick Wakeman, both are perfect for this kind of organ driven simple psych-prog sound. The band was wise to stick to their strengths and did not attempt anything overtly complex. Attempts to sound more progressive with the same lineup proved to be not so successful in the second album. In this however, they are spot on with their music. I would say a 10/10.

Independance - This was a best effort this line up put and they seeked no outside help. The powerful sound is purely due to band's own skill. A 10/10.

Uniqueness - Okay early Deep Purple and Vanilla Fudge did do heavy psychedelic music at this time that was also progressively organ drive just like Yes, but they did not have diverse elements like jazz and folk in their albums. I say this does not stand out as Led Zeppelin and Pink Floyd debuts as landmark albums of its time because it is not as shocking. I give this albun a 9.95/10 for uniqueness.

Execution - Though Harold Land and Sweetness don't stand out as the rest, their execution is good. The album on the whole is pretty much flawless, though not perfect. I have to give this a 10/10 since I don't see major errors.

The average score for the album based on the 7 quality factors above is
9.97

Zee PROS UND Zee HOES...
Pros - This is their most charming album in my opinion. It lacks the adventure of their latter classic albums but it almost as consistent as their best albums. It is their most rocking album apart from The Yes Album and Relayer. This is also their most jazzy album apart from Relayer. The core Yes fans have ignored this album, but I think they have a mistake.

Hoes - You really have to be a hoe to find a hoe in this album.

Zee CHANGES...
In - None Out -None Shorten - Harold Land, Sweetness Lengthen - Looking Around, Survival Change - None

MASTERPIECE #26 RELAYER YES
1
Gates Of Delirium (21:50)
2
Soundchaser (9:26)
3
To Be Over (9:06)
 
 
 
 
 
Jon Anderson - lead vocals
Steve Howe
- electric and acoustic guitar, backing vocals
Alan White
- drums, percussion
Patrick Moraz - organ, piano
Chris Squire - electric bass guitar, backing vocals
MASTERPIECE #27 MEDDLE PINK FLOYD
1
One Of These Days (5:57)
2
A Pillow Of Winds (5:10)
3
Fearless (6:08)
4
San Tropez (3:43)
5
Seamus (2:16)
6
Echoes (23:29)
 
 
 

David Gilmour - electric, slide and acoustic guitar, bass guitar, lead vocals, sound effects
Nick Mason - drums, percussion, backward cymbal, lead vocals, sound effects
Roger Waters
- electric bass guitar, acoustic guitar, lead vocals, sound effects
Rick Wright - organ, piano, lead vocals, sound effects

Zee Legacy...
Zee Sound...

Zee Songs...

Zee PROS UND Zee HOES...
Pros -
Hoes -

Zee CHANGES...
In - None Out -None Shorten - None Lengthen - None Change - None

MASTERPIECE #28 TIME MACHINE DZYAN
1
Kabisrain (7:59)
2
Magika (8:45)
3
Light Shining Out Of Darkness (3:13)
4
Time Machine (17:47)
 
 
 

Peter Giger - drums, percussion
Reinhard Karwatky - electric bass guitar, synthesizer, mellotron
Eddy Marron
- electric guitar, sitar, saxophone


Zee Legacy...
....

Zee Sound...
....

Zee Songs...

Zee PROS UND Zee HOES...
Pros - ...

Hoes - ...

MASTERPIECE #29 A NIGHT AT THE OPERA QUEEN
1
Death On Two Legs (3:43)
2
Lazing On A Sunday Afternoon (1:08)
3
I'm In Love With My Car (3:05)
4
You Are My Best Friend (2:50)
5
39 (3:25)
6
Sweet Lady (4:01)
7
Seaside Rendezvous (2:13)
8
The Prophet's Song (8:17)
9
Love Of My Life (3:38)
10
Good Company (3:26)
11
Bohemian Rhapsody (5:55)
12
God Save The Queen (1:11)
John Deacon – bass guitar, double-bass, electric piano, acoustic guitars
Brian May – guitars, ukelele, backing vocals, lead vocals, toy koto, harp
Freddie Mercury – lead and backing vocals, piano, jangle piano, woodwind vocalisations
Roger Taylor – drums, percussion, lead vocals, brass vocalisations, backing vocals
 
 
MASTERPIECE #31 THE INNER MOUNTING FLAME THE MAHAVISHNU ORCHESTRA
1
Meeting Of The Spirits (6:52)
2
Dawn (5:10)
3
The Noonward Race (6:28)
4
A Lotus on Irish Streams (5:39)
5
Vital Transformations (6:16)
6
The Dance Of Maya (7:17)
7
You Know You Know (5:17)
8
Awakening (3:32)
 
 
 
Billy Cobham - drums, percussion
Jerry Goodman - violin
Jan Hammer - keyboards, organ
Rick Laird - bass
John McLaughlin - guitar
MASTERPIECE #32 LIVE AT NEW HAVEN YES
1
Yours Is No Disgrace (10:56)
2
I've Seen All Good People (7:06)
3
Clap/Classical Gas (4:29)
4
Perpetual Change/Dum Solo (14:21)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
MASTERPIECE #33 LARK'S TONGUE IN ASPIC KING CRIMSON
1
Lark's Tongue In Aspic Part 1 (13:36)
2
Book Of Saturday (2:53)
3
Exiles (7:40)
4
Easy Money (7:54)
5
The Talking Drum (7:26)
6
Lark's Tongue In Aspic Part 2 (7:07)
 
Bill Bruford – drums
David Cross – violin, viola, mellotron, electric piano, flute
Robert Fripp – guitars, mellotron, electric piano, devices
Jamie Muir – percussion
John Wetton – bass, vocals, piano
 
 
MASTERPIECE #35 YOU GONG
1
Thoughts For Naught (1:32)
2
A.P.H.P's Advice (1:47)
3
Magick Mother Invocation (2:06)
4
Master Builder (6:07)
5
A Sprinkling Of Clouds (8:55)
6
Perfect Mystery (2:29)
7
The Isle Of Everywhere (10:20)
8
You Never Blow Yr Trip Forever (11:22)
 
 
 
Daevid Allen – vocals, glissando guitar
Tim Blake – Moog and EMS systhesisers, mellotron
Mireille Bauer – percussion
Miquette Giraudy - vocals
Didier Malherbe – saxophone, flute, vocals
Benoit Moerlen – percussion
Pierre Moerlen – drums, percussion
Steve Hillage – lead Guitar
Mike Howlett – bass guitar
Gilli Smyth – vocals
MASTERPIECE #36 ROXY MUSIC ROXY MUSIC
1
Re-Make/Re-Model (5:14)
2
Ladytron (4:26)
3
If There Is Something (6:34)
4
Virginia Plain (2:58)
5
2 H.B. (4:30)
6
The Bob (5:48)
7
Chance Meeting (3:08)
8
Would You Believe (3:53)
9
See Breezes (7:03)
10
Bitters End (2:03)
 
Brian Eno – VCS3 synthesizer, tape effects, backing vocals
Bryan Ferry – vocals, piano, pianet, mellotron
Andy Mackay – oboe, saxophone, backing vocals
Phil Manzanera – electric guitar
Graham Simpson – bass guitar
Paul Thompson – drums
Guest:
Rik Kenton – bass guitar
MASTERPIECE #37 PAWN HEARTS VAN DER GRAAF GENERATOR
1
Lemmings (11:37)
2
Man-Erg (10:20)
3
A Plague Of Lighthouse Keepers (23:04)
 
 
 
 

Hugh Banton - organ, piano, mellotron, synthesizer, bass pedals, electric bass guitar, vocals
Guy Evans - drums, tympani, percussion, piano
Peter Hammill
- lead vocals, acoustic and slide guitar, electric piano, piano
David Jackson - alto, tenor and soprano saxophones, flute and background vocals
Guest:
Robert Fripp
- electric guitar on Man-Erg and A Plague Of Lighthouse Keepers


Zee Legacy...
This is considered the best krautrock (whatever the fuck that means) albums of all time. This is definitely the best prog album to come out of Germany. Alternative and indie rock fans love it because it is so unconventional and it is also massively influencial TO THEM. Fucking asshole indie/alternative rock fan! Anything which is not commercially successful is GOLD for them. But I digress. This one was not commercially successful yet GOOD. A rare combination... the same could not be send of the all the crap 80s, 90s and 00s albums that have been influenced by this album. But it is not Can's fault that clueless snobby indie rockers worship them. This album is one of the rare experimental albums which almost knowns. Okay, tin-eared mainstream rock critics might not have not heard this album, but would have definitely at least heard of this album and this band. Can have a great reputation. And they rightly deserves it. Zee Sound...
Can were the weirdest of the prog bands. They were so weird, some don't even consider them prog. Well, if you are playing complicated and technically skilled stuff and on top of that you have 20 minute epics (three of them on this album), you are being ultra-ambitious and you are prog. In fact Can are one of the finest prog bands ever - better than Genesis and King Crimson who seem to get a lot of prog hype. Genesis could hardly ever rock and King Crimson could hardly ever write a memorable song; Can could do both very well. And they were consistent in doing that. They just happen to be German and they happen to be rather inaccessible. In fact I consider them less inaccessible than even Van Der Graaf Generator (who really wrote lot of straightforward stuff if you are paying attention). Can hardly ever wrote anything simple. They were proggers of the proggers ;-) One funny thing I noticed is that in my four holy trinities here, during the 1967-78 period, the band at the top is the most accessible and the band at the bottom of the trinity is the least accessible (Led Zeppelin>Deep Purple> Black Sabbath, Yes >VDGG>Can, Pink Floyd>Popol Vuh>Kraftwerk, and Hawkwind>Aphrodite's Child>Mahavishnu Orchestra in terms of accessibility). Can played jazz music with rock instruments. Thats the way to put it. Their sound is a mix of jazz, avant-garde, rock, classical, funk, and trance. Liebezeit was the jazz guy, Schmidt was the classical/electronic/trance guy, Czukay was the funk guy, Karoli was more rock and Suzuki lead them into avantgarde. The presence of different personalities with different backgrounds (just like for Led Zeppelin, Yes and VDGG) led to the progressive nature of their sound. This is by far their least accessible and most experimental album. This is their only double album and this gave them the freedom to do as much experimentation as possible. Truly unique and at times scary. Side 3 and 4 in my opinion drops the quality of the album down a notch. Yes, the experimentation and overall wackiness of both the sides are endearing but it does not have the similar effect as Side 1 and Side 2 which are perfect in my opinion. This would have been a perfect single album.

Zee Songs...
Double albums are hardly perfect. But this is almost there. The first three songs are the best, they are the most accessible and also the most memorable. The fourth song is a fabulous jam. The fifth and sixth are really bizarre and very enjoyable. The last song the most accessible is in fact the worst (but by no means bad) one. I think this album could have been higher if the albums above it were not better. It was hard for me to put this at 17 but thats how the calculations turned out. May be if they had some other more interesting song as their final song, this could have been higher.

Zee PROS UND Zee HOES...
Pros - The most ambitious and experimental rock album to come out of Germany. This double album is one of the few double albums to be almost flawless. This is the highest (studio) double album on the list.

Hoes - The only pop oriented song on the album - the final song Bring Me Coffee or Tea has the least impact on the album. Since the song is the final song on the album, it is somewhat of an anticlimax. Shouldn't they have ended the album with the wackiest thing they could ever imagine?

MASTERPIECE #38 THE MAN-MACHINE KRAFTWERK
1
The Robots (6:11)
2
Spacelab (5:51)
3
Metropolis (5:59)
4
The Model (3:38)
5
Neon Lights (9:03)
6
The Man-Machine (5:28)
 
 
 
MASTERPIECE #39 HOUSES OF THE HOLY LED ZEPPELIN
1
The Song Remains The Same (5:32)
2
The Rain Song (7:39)
3
Over The Hills And Far Away (4:50)
4
The Crunge (3:17)
5
Dancing Days (3:43)
6
D'yer Mak'er (4:23)
7
No Quarter (7:00)
8
The Ocean (4:31)
 

John Bonham (a.k.a. Bonzo) - drums, backing vocals
John Paul Jones (a.k.a. Jonesy) - electric bass guitar, organ, mellotron, piano, electric piano, synthesizer, harpsichord, backing vocals
Jimmy Page (a.k.a. Pagey) - acoustic, electric, slide and lap steel guitar, theremin production
Robert Plant (a.k.a. Percy) - lead and backing vocals

Zee Legacy...
Houses Of The Holy is usually considered the weakest of the first six Led Zeppelin classics. I do not agree completely; I rate this over Physical Graffiti which had more minor flaws than this album. This album sees Led Zeppelin going towards more orchestral and textured music. By 1972, Yes had already released two very successful keyboard dominated rock albums (The Yes Album and Fragile) and were threatening to take over some of the limelight Led Zeppelin was sharing in the US. Progressive rock was on its way up with Yes, Jethro Tull and ELP all making inroads in the mainstream. So this was the time for Zeppelin to embrace keyboard-driven prog too. This is their most keyboard dominated album. This is also their most diverse (yes, even more diverse than Led Zeppelin III). This is considered another Led Zeppelin masterpiece by many. I am glad they went this route because John Paul Jones was a very good keyboardist and he got a good opportunity to showcase his skills on keyboards too.

Zee Sound...

The album is a mix of different sounds once again like their previous album. The major difference here is there is less hard rock in here and most of the songs have shocking new sounds which you haven't heard on any Led Zeppelin album before. That may be a reason classic rock critics rate this album lower than the others - not much hard rock and too much variety. The big songs on the album are suprisingly keyboard oriented songs - The Rain Song and No Quarter. They are both slow and un-heavy. The Rain Song is probably one of the gentlest Led Zeppelin song ever that is not folksy. The orchestration on this emotional song is sublime. It sounds so not Zeppelin, yet so Zeppelin! No Quarter is much in contrast and is darker and chilling feel to it. It is a song about the Vikings and has that icey gothic feel to it. The other songs on the album There is delightful reggae rock here on D'Yer Mak'er (which is phonetically - Jamaica) inspired by Bob Marley and also funky The Crunge inspired by James Brown. Then there is a folk+hard rock number Over The Hills And Far Away which has a progressive style too. Even the opening number The Song Remains The Same sounds like a symphonic metal number (in contrast to the straightforward metal songs which opened the first four albums). The only song which does not sound progressive and sounds like plain hard rock is Dancing Days. I consider this a further progression of Led Zeppelin sound.

Zee Songs...
\This is Led Zeppelin's most progressive album. In my opinion, it could have been even more progressive. Like the first four Zeppelin albums, where I always found 2 songs which I greedily want to be replaced, here too I have two songs that I feel can be replaced. The two weaker songs here weaker than all the other 2 songs replacement candidates from the first four albums. The Crunge and Dancing Days the shortest song on the album are the clear culprits here. The funk aspect of The Crunge is interesting but both the vocals are somewhat weaker than usual. I also musically it could have benefited if it was less raw and more layered. Dancing Days is a bit too repetitive With my replacements, I made Led Zeppelin I more psychedelic, Led Zeppelin II more groovy, Led Zeppelin more folksy, Led Zeppelin IV more epic. So what do you think I want this album to be? Yes, I want this album to be more progressive than than it is. What would make it progressive? I have an idea. I rejected eight songs from the first four Led Zeppelin albums. Out of that eight, I feel four of them would fit in there perfectly as songs which would add a lot of variety in here. Led Zeppelin II instrumental Moby Dick which was dominated by a drum solo could fit in here. I would recommend a shorter version. I would also recommend the inclusion of the organ led Thank You from Led Zeppelin II and the string arrangement and synth dominated orchestral folk song Friends from Led Zeppelin III.. Another worthy inclusion would the mandolin led The Battle Of Evemore. To make way for these songs, I would advocate making D'yer Mak'er shorter by about 2 minutes and also make it an instrumental. Though I like it is a fun song, it is somewhat of a silly song and too long for a silly song. I don't care for the somewhat silly repetitive lyrics, so singing could be avoided on this song. I would also advocate a minute chopped from The Song Remains The Same, The Rain Song and The Ocean. They are all great songs but their shortening would given us 3 additional minutes and would aid the inclusion of the four songs I recommended. Anyway back to the real album - I think Houses Of The Holy is another consistent masterpiece but it has a minor problem of having two songs which look weaker than the other six. As the result, this album scored 9.90 out of 10 which made sure this album stay at rank 14th. Though essentially tied with Led Zeppelin III and IV, this album I have rated the lowest because this one is the least best flowing of the three. Too many diversions, I think.

Zee PROS UND Zee HOES...
Pros - Another set of groovy songs - this time they all sound different from each other. This is Led Zeppelin's most progressive attempt. They embrace funk, reggae, ballad and goth music here. Is this the same band which produced those heavy metal albums in the 60s?

Hoes - Song selection is a bit iffy here. The vocals on The Crunge are not so hot and the song in a whole is not so memorable. Dancing Days is too repetitve. Too bad they excluded the wrong songs instead of these two.

Zee CHANGES...
In - Houses Of The Holy Out - The Crunge, Dancing Days, D' Yer Mak' er Shorten - None Lengthen - None Change - None

Zee GERMANS...
In my rather futile, worthless and utterly preposterous atempt to all link things good with Zee Germans, I found that the only thing German about this album is their masterpiece song from this album - No Quarter. No Quarter refers to the infamous Nordic (Norway, Denmark, Sweden, Iceland, Finland) Vikings who plundered sailing passenger ships. The Vikings spoke North Germanic languages which is related to the West Germanic language of modern Germany.

MASTERPIECE #40 BITCHES BREW MILES DAVIS
1
Pharoah's Dance (20:00)
2
Bitches Brew (26:59)
3
Spanish Key (17:29)
4
John McLaughlin (4:26)
5
Miles Runs The Voodoo Down (14:04)
6
Sanctuary (10:52)
 
 
 
 
 

Don Alias – drums, congas
Harvey Brooks – electric bass
Chick Corea – electric piano
Miles Davis – trumpet
Jack DeJohnette – drums
Dave Holland – bass
Bennie Maupin – bass clarinet
John McLaughlin – electric guitar
Juma Santos – shaker, congas
Wayne Shorter
– soprano saxophone
Lenny White – drums
Larry Young – electric piano
Joe Zawinul – electric piano

 
 
MASTERPIECE #42 ATOM HEART MOTHER PINK FLOYD
1
Atom Heart Mother (23:44)
2
If (4:31)
3
Summer (5:29)
4
Fat Old Sun (5:22)
5
Alan Psychedelic Breakfast (13:00)
 
 
 
 
 
MASTERPIECE #43 LIVE AT LONDON LED ZEPPELIN
1
We're Gonna Groove (3:13)
2
I Can't Quit You Baby (6:56)
3
Dazed And Confused (15:33)
4
White Summer (12:23)
5
What Is And What Should Never Be (4:39)
6
How Many More Times (20:17)
7
Moby Dick (15:21)
8
Whole Lotta Love (6:24)
9
Communication Breakdown (4:16)
10
C'mon Everybody (2:31)
11
Something Else (2:10)
12
Bring It On Home (7:44)

John Bonham (a.k.a. Bonzo) - drums, percussion, backing vocals, lead vocals
John Paul Jones (a.k.a. Jonesy) - electric bass guitar, organ, backing vocals
Jimmy Page (a.k.a. Pagey) - acoustic and electric guitar, backing vocals
Robert Plant (a.k.a. Percy) - harmonica, lead vocals

Zee Legacy...
This album has not been released as an audio album. Of course Jimmy Page released the video of this one-night-in-heaven concert on the Led Zeppelin DVD. Not all the songs from this concert, dated Jan 9th 1970, made it to the DVD though. I wish Zeppelin would release the entire concert but I suspect that they will, primarily because I think complete versions of Heartbreaker, Since I've Been Loving You, Organ Solo/Thank You and Long Tall Sally, all performed that night are unavailable. Regardless, this is perhaps one of the greatest Led Zeppelin performances ever, if not the greatest. You see Led Zeppelin heavily toured during their prime (1968-71, before Plant's voice lost its power and range, courtesy relentless high pitched scream singing and cigarette abuse); but few performances of theirs during their prime have soundboard quality. And this is one of them. At their peak they were an aggressive act of nature who could blow everyone in their path with their sheer monstrosity. I very much prefer this performance over their performances in their released live albums - The Song Remains The Same (a somewhat tired band at the end of the tour), BBC Sessions (lacking a concert feel and a uniformity of sound since the album is composed of recordings from different stages of their career), and How The West Was Won (Plant starting to lose this voice and some of the songs running to excess and unjustifiable lengths).

Zee Sound...
The Yardbirds fucked together and had twins. One - a daughter named Renaissance who had her ups and downs during her different PERIODs and other the son named Led Zeppelin who didn't live long enough but was always a brilliant kid when he was alive. This is Led Zeppelin at his most transcendental brilliance. The whole band REALLY enjoyed performing even though they were very nervous, since this was their biggest concert till date and in their own country and attended by big wigs like John Lennon, Jeff Beck and Eric Clapton. If you watch the DVD, you will see that the members are having the time of their lives. This concert happened right when they had just started recording Led Zeppelin III and started moving away from their psychedelic and blues influences on to other territories like folk, country and world music. The only song from Led Zeppelin III they would perform this night is the only hard core blues number - Since I've Been Loving You which was originally meant for Led Zeppelin II. Since that song is not available, this album is composed of material from their first two albums, exclusively. Also, John Paul Jones is mostly only on bass here, with his organ-driven songs - Since I've Been Loving You and Organ Solo/Thank You being available. So this album is basically a heavy fast to mid tempo album guitar, bass and drums driven heavy druggy psychedelic/progressive album from beginning to end. Robert Plant has a young powerful voice here and easily hits the high notes and sometimes sounds even more powerful than on the recorded versions. You won't find him at this form on the much lauded How The West Was Won album. Jimmy Page gives a incredibly tight performance by his standards. John Bonham is a primitive force of thunder here. Elements of funk and jazz creep in to this drumming here and he does that minimalistically and tribalistically without any frills. John Paul Jones is fabulous on bass guitar and uses it as a dual lead instrument with Jimmy Page's guitar for the most part. Zeppelin is fresh here and every band member seems like a seasoned pro courtesy year and half of countinous touring since their initial concerts in September 1968. In short this is Led Zeppelin at its peak, live.

Zee Songs...
The setlist for this concert is fantastic. The thirteen songs which made it to the Led Zeppelin DVD have a certain groovy and bouncy feel to them that makes you ready to shake you buns and have a jolly good time. Imagine yourself dancing in a dimly lit large bar with thousands of enthusiastic folks who are either high on drugs or alcholol and loving every minute of it. That is the feeling you get when you watch the video or listen to the audio of this album. Robert Plant was an able frontman who reacted to the crowd and let the crowd react to them. The rest of the band knew how to weave a hypnotic smoke of sound and let the songs effortlessly drift into trancendental bliss. There is a phrase saying "I am high on life"; well if you listen or watch this concert you could say "My life is high on Led Zeppelin". As for the song themselves, almost everyone of them supercedes the studio version. Plant, Page, Jones and Bonham manage to add something special to every song on the menu. Its like someone spiked your drink with something which made it even better and you can't resist going for another round of it. The three shortest song on the album are the rock n rollers We're Groove, C'mon Everybody and Something Else which are done with a lot of energy and match the originals to the energy while adding dynamic power to it. The bluesiest number of the day was the Willie Dixon cover from the first album - I Can't Quit You Baby. I thought that this song was the weakest song on Led Zeppelin I lacking the power the rest of the album possessed. Here you get a definitive version of it. The song really works in the live setting and instead of being a slow meandering blues song, it becomes an improvised trance-inducing showcase of Jonesy's bass telepathy with Bonzo's thundering drums and Page's blues wailing guitar answer to Page's powerful emotional high pitched vocals. The energy of the young guns Plant and Bonham is complemented by Page and Jonesy's understanding of where the song is going and where it should be heading to. It's like every member knows what the other is doing and what he is supposed to go. I Can't Quit You Baby is stretched by 2 minutes than on Led Zeppelin I and gets more room to breathe and more time to shine. The four epics on the album are the Page's solo acoustic guitar showpiece White Summer, Bonzo's drum solo Moby Dick and much expanded versions of Dazed And Confused and How Many More Times. White Summer dispels all notions of Page being a sloppy guitarist. At his prime, he was absolutely spot on. In the 12 minute improvisation, he hardly ever falters. Bonzo gives his best display of percussion skills on Moby Dick. I have heard many other versions of Moby Dick, but have never heard a better version than this one. This is probably the only live version of Moby Dick, I would sit through entirely. In most future concerts they would have Dazed And Confused stretched out to 25 minutes, here it is 10 minute shorter and hence feels a lot more precise and concise. I am not saying there should be limits to improvisation, but I feel tasteful improvisation always show a certain degree of restraint. Zeppelin do the same over here. The vices of excess haven't completely caught up with them here. And that is a good thing. I wish ELP had seen this performance :-) How Many More Times is probably the highlight of the album. In latter performances Led Zeppelin always did a medley with Whole Lotta Love. Here they do it with How Many More Times, which I think is the ideal song for medley. It has a driving bolero rhythm which in my opinion leads on to other songs seamlessly. Whole Lotta Love on the other hand has a great Page theremin and Plant orgasmic wail section which gets lost in the medleys. Here, Whole Lotta Love is short and you get the full impact of the theremin/orgasm section. Coming back to How Many More Times, it is Led Zeppelin's best progressive blues song apart from Travelling Riverside Blues and Led Zeppelin once again prove that they were among the most visionary of the blues rock bands by adding complex dynamics to a song dynamically on stage simply by following each others moves on stage. What Is And What Should Never Be is probably the closest to the studio version, which is kind of surprising considering that the original version had a lot of studio effects. Bring It On Home is twice as effective as the studio version in its extended format and is far more effective. Communication Breakdown is probably the only song which does not improve the original. While it does not match the original for its speed and power, this version does have a smooth touch to it which is compatible with the rest of the performance. All in all, an unbelieveable concert in spite of the fact that it is almost 100 minutes long and could ideally only fit as a triple album, if it were to be released in audio LP format.

We’re  Gonnna Groove – The song was the most danceable song of the night. This song establishes the mood and sound of the day. All four instruments (including Plant’s voice) are audible distinct from each other and seem to come from different directions. Bass is constant and upfront. Drums are slightly behind bass on the mix but constant just like the bass. Vocals are more prominent and the guitar only becomes prominent during solos. The guitar riffs stay solidly in background and do not drown any of the other instruments. In fact none of the members drown each other. To digress, the hazy atmosphere of the concert is somewhat similar to Hawkwind’s Space Ritual concert except that the vocalist and guitarist are more talented and Jonesy’ bass and Bonzo’s drums are not as fast and are more deliberate. And of course there is no Dik Mik synthesizers here. But then Page uses different effects like violin bow on guitar, slide guitar and theremin to make the songs spaced out and sound like synthesizer.  The guitar sound is also different. Page’s soloing and riffing are a lot less grungy and less noisy than Dave Brock’s riffing on Space Ritual.

I Can’t Quit You Baby – This is so much better than the original version on Led Zeppelin. The bass and drums lock in a slow groove and leave enough space for both Page and Plant to improvise. Plant gives one of his most powerful vocal performances by stretching words and sentences and is able to convey the mental anguish of this blues song perfectly. The song alternates between heavy and somewhat jazzy mellow sections effectively. In the studio version the song is too slow and lacks power compared to the rest of the album. No such complaints here. The song ends with a short drum solo which reminds of the drum solo at the end of Rock And Roll.

Dazed And Confused – This song starts with Jonesy’s galloping bassline just like the studio version, but here the bass is somewhat heavier and prominent. There is a gong sound at the beginning which already gives the song a slightly different flavor. Page plays the guitar like a synthesizer and gives a spacey echo effect to the song. Guitar is sparse and drums are slight until they all go to a jam section. Then they alternate again to a slow bass driven section when it is mostly vocals and bass up there with gentle drums in background and no guitar. The song is like a roller coaster gliding through subtle twists and turns that is not noticeable unless you pay proper attention to it.  About mid-way through the song, Page goes into an elongated bow on guitar solo which honestly is one of the most gothic things I have heard. This section sounds somewhat like the theremin section on Whole Lotta Love but is more organic. Once the creepy Page solo section is over, the bands goes absolutely bonkers with a mighty jam session where the bass goes into hyperdrive with added venom from Bonzo’s drum and Page long solo. Seriously this part gives me a feeling that I am going through a space journey and got sucked into some black hole and my space ship is going so fast that I can barely react to it. The bass dominated groove continues until the song comes to a somewhat abrupt end. Phew! Powerful stuff!

White Summer – What more to say about this solo Page piece than that this song absolutely prove that Jimmy Page had a fine understanding of folk, Celtic and Indian classical music. This was of course a Yardbirds song from their last album. That version had oboe and tabla on it, thus giving it a more Indian and authentic flavor. That feel is somewhat lost here with only electric guitar and regular drums here. And this version is also bit too long in my opinion. At 12 minutes it is too much, even though it is still fabulous and awe-inspiring. 

What Is And What Should Never Be – This is perhaps the one song on this night, they came closest to emulating the studio version.  And that’s the funny thing about it. I woud have guessed that this is probably one of the more difficult songs to replicate considering the studio effects used in the album version which give a moody foggy morning feel to the song. I always thought that this was the best song on Led Zeppelin II apart from Ramble On. I really love the early morning smokey feel of the song. This is Led Zeppelin at their most psychedelic. They were not able to spread the fabulous feel of this song entirely through Led Zeppelin II, but they were able to do the same thing over this entire concert (even though they performed during the night) and that’s what makes this concert so special.

How Many More Times – This is the highlight of the album. The band settles on a nice groove from the beginning and never let go. In the meanwhile Plant improvises adding vocal lines that didn’t exist in the studio version. Page goes on overlong solos throughout the song but since the bass is so groovy and drums so perfect, we never notice that Page is actually taking it too far with some of his solos.  The elongated song goes on for 12  ½ (4 minutes more than the studio version) before it drifts into a nice medley featuring old blues songs (Boogie Chillun, Bottle Up 'n Go, Move On Down The Line, Leave My Woman Alone, Lemon Song) and then returning back to the original song. Since the song even without the medley section is nearly twice the size of the original, the band is able to able to jam more freely on this and create a groove superior to the studio version. The medley section is fabulous and in my opinion the choice of blues songs is impeccable (and far better than latter medleys) as each song seem to lead to the other song effortlessly. This song is like a long jam which puts you on a trance and you never notice it is 20 minutes long. So you see, there was a reason bands from these times liked to jam, not because they had the technical prowess to do it, but because they felt they could do more justice to the song and add transcendental feel to them. And Led Zeppelin was the best bands to do it. In my opinion only Hawkwind had similar psychedelic transcendental power in their live performances.

Moby Dick – Ah! the infamous Moby Dick featuring a long drum solo! This version is actually 5 minutes shorter and lasts *only* 15 minutes. Regardless of the length, this is one time I can take this in one sitting entirely! Part of the reason, this performance is better to the later ones is because Bonzo was relatively fresh with performing this song. He only started performing this song since 3 months (this is most likely his 15th performance of Moby Dick). Here Bonzo is super fit (not fat yet) and is full of energy. He alternates from intricate tabla like percussion to powerful rock n roll drum beats to tribal percussion grooves and uses his hands for most part. There is also subtle and precise jazz like drumming in the slower sections. The variety and enthusiasm of this performance gives a fresh rawness to it. Sometimes it feels like there are multiple drummers out there. Such was the dexterity of our dear Bonzo. I think this song is actually more enjoyable than the Page solo spot White Summer even though it is 3 minutes longer.

Whole Lotta Love – The greatest trick the devils ever pulled is convincing me there were two guitars on this version of the song. It took time for me to realize that Jonesy is playing the bass like a guitar and dueling with Page - low pitched bass guitar vs high pitched guitar! After the initial duel, the song quickly goes into the famous theremin/orgasm section. Theremin maestro Page makes piercing creepy theremin riffs with one hand while playing guitar riff alternatively with the other. Towards the end of the song strangely Plant's vocal start echoing. I am not sure how this happened but it sounds awesome.

Communication Breakdown – One metal song following another, wow! This version is longer and does not match the intensity and ferocity of the studio. Though it doesn't top the the studio version it offers an alternative version. The band mid-way abandons the original melody and drifts to a different groove before coming back to the original song. I think it was rather daring of the band to do it. So I give them props for that.

C’mon Everybody – This is the best short song of this night. I always loved the Eddie Cochran version. This one lacks the piano solo but makes up for it with plain energy and heaviness. It’s like a heavy metal version of the original. The band were smiling at each other in this song. They really enjoyed it.

Somethin’ Else – Another Eddie Cochran cover and it kicks ass. Short and fun!

Bring It On Home – The studio version has a weird intro and sounds mid-tempo and is somewhat generic by Led Zeppelin standards. This version is a much better explored version and not only lasts longer but is more menacing and has more music to it making it sound more complex. There is a guitar-drum duel in the middle of the song which is fun to hear and then there is another short harmonica-guitar duel which is another great addition to the song. Nice way to end the concert!

Zee PROS UND Zee HOES...
Pros - Lots of energy, lots of Zep. These guys prove that they were among the best live bands ever, if not the best. They also prove that each one of the was supremely talented with their instruments and knew their roles within the songs very well. Robert Plant proves he is a singer who could exude incredible emotion while being able to sing both high and low, often in the same song. He also proves to be an entertaining frontmen. Jimmy Page proves that he is a wizard of the blues guitar and other synthesize like sound effects using slide, violin on guitar, and theremin. Jonesy proves he is the backbone of the band with his relentless driving rhythm and lead basslines. And John Bonham proves he is not just a "restrained monster" on drums, but is also a guru of precise percussion. He never plays for himself and never shows off but is always in the foreground and is always there upfront. That's what you would expect from a great drummer.

Hoes - How about some more music? I am just greedy here. I wanted to hear Good Times Bad Times, Babe I'm Gonna Leave You, You Shook Me, Your Time Is Gonna Come, The Lemon Song, Livin Loving Maid, Ramble On, Travelling Riverside Blues, etc. Why not perform every thing they recorded until then? Me so greedy, Me so horny, Me rocky rocky!

Zee CHANGES...
In - All those songs mentioned in the Hoes section Out - None Shorten - None Lengthen - None Change - None

Zee GERMANS...
In my rather futile, worthless and utterly preposterous atempt to all link things good with Zee Germans, I found that the only thing German about this album is the utter gothic darkness in which the movie to this soundtrack was shot and the utter barbaricness with which the Zepsters play their instruments and the utter hynoticsm of the band performance. Needless to say, this album by an English band is German in its own creepy way.

MASTERPIECE #44 SUPER FLY CURTIS MAYFIELD
1
Little Child, Running Wild (5:23)
2
Pusherman (5:04)
3
Freddie's Dead (5:27)
4
Junkie Chase (1:36)
5
Give Me Your Love (4:20)
6
Eddie You Should Know Better (2:16)
7
No Thing On Me (4:53)
8
Think (3:43)
9
Super Fly (3:55)
 
 
Master Henry Gibson – percussion
Morris Jennings – drums (all tracks except "Pusherman")
Curtis Mayfield – composer, vocals, guitar, producer
Tyrone McCullen – drums ("Pusherman")
Craig McMullen – guitar
Joseph Lucky Scott – bass
MASTERPIECE #45 IN THE COURT OF THE CRIMSON KING KING CRIMSON
1
21st Century Schizoid Man (7:21)
2
I Talk To The Wind (6:05)
3
Epitaph (8:47)
4
Moonchild (12:13)
5
The Court Of The Crimson King (9:25)
6
After The Flood (11:29)
 
Robert Fripp – guitars
Michael Giles – drums, percussion, backing vocals
Greg Lake – lead vocals, bass guitar
Ian McDonald – saxophone, flute, clarinet, bass clarinet, mellotron, vibraphone, backing vocals
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

MASTERPIECE #7 PHYSICAL GRAFFITI (1974) LED ZEPPELIN 81/105 = 77.14%
1
Custard Pie (4:13) üüüüüü
2
The Rover (5:37) üüü
3
In My Time Of Dying (11:04) üüüüüü
4
Houses Of The Holy (4:02) üüüüüü
5
Trampled Underfoot (5:37) üüüüüü
6
Kashmir (8:37) üüüüüüü
7
In The Light (8:46) üüüüüüü
8
Bron-Yr-Aur (2:06) üüüüüüü
9
Down By The Seaside (5:13) üüüüüüü
10
Ten Years Gone (6:32) üüüüüüü
11
Night Flight (3:36) üüüü
12
The Wanton Song (4:10) üüü
13
Boogie With Stu (3:53) üüüü
14
Black Country Woman (4:24) üüüü
15
Sick Again (4:42) üüüü

John Bonham (a.k.a. Bonzo) - drums, percussion
John Paul Jones (a.k.a. Jonesy) - electric bass, acoustic bass, organ, mellotron, piano, e-piano, synth, mandolin, acoustic guitar, clavinet
Jimmy Page (a.k.a. Pagey) - acoustic, electric, slide and lap steel guitar, mandolin, production
Robert Plant (a.k.a. Percy) - acoustic guitar, harmonica, lead vocals
Guests: Ian Stewart - piano on Boogie With Stu and Black Country Woman

Zee Legacy...
This is the final Led Zeppelin masterpiece. After this they would release only 2 more albums before that tragic John Bonham death in 1980. Their last two albums are pretty good and I like them, but I would not call them masterpieces. The problem with those two albums were they did not feature full contributions by the entire band. Presence was all Page with some excellent contributions by Bonham, but didn't feature much of John Paul Jones multi-instrumentation and features some of Plant's most tired vocals. I feel both Jones and Plant - the most homesick fellows of the band were mentally absent for the album. Plant was also recuperating from an accident as well and was in pain and could barely stand up. This is a super rushed album which should not have been released in my opinion. The final album In Through The Out Door had the other two guys (Page and Bonham) contributing lesser. Plant's vocals recovered and Jonesy gave some wonderful keyboard contributions and both seemed to determined to revive Led Zeppelin after almost 3 years of turmoil, but Page who was under drug abuse is barely visible and Bonham somewhat muted courtesy his alchohol problem. None of these issues were present on their sixth classic Physical Graffiti. The only issue was Plant's deteriorating vocal range. They covered it up by releasing older songs along with the new ones. This album was recorded by Feb 1974; their real problems would start only in August 1975 when Plant and his wife would get injured in a car accident. This album is Led Zeppelin's only double album and has lot of variety in it and presents everything Zeppelin were about. They weren't planning on a double album initially. They recorded 8 songs in 1974 which exceeded the length of an LP and decided to add some old leftover songs (7 of them) to make it a double. Since this was never intended as a pompous double album (as most double albums are), this is a the best double album of studio mateiral. It is almost perfect, but I think it could have been "perfecter" ;-) Zee Sound...
This is the third progressive sounding album in the row. Here, seven older leftover songs were padded on to the single album they had recorded in 1974 to make it a double album. The eight new songs recorded in 1974 were good and this would have been a good single album as well. But with the old songs, it just becomes even more versatile and better. The sound on the album ranges from metal (Custard Pie) to hard rock (The Rover, Houses Of The Holy, Night Flight, The Wanton Song, Sick Again) to Rolling Stones like loose rock n roll (Boogie With Stu), to blues-folk fusion (Black Country Woman), to funk rock (Trampled Underfoot) to prog rock (Kashmir, In The Light, In My Time Of Dying, Down By The Seaside, and Ten Years Gone). I find the prog oriented as the strongest material on the album. It was the era of prog era in 1974 after all and progressive Led Zeppelin was at its peak then. My most favorite song on the album is Ten Years Gone. It has one of the most emotional Page solos ever and one of the coolest Jonesy basslines ever.

Zee Songs...
I have suggested that two songs each from the first albums be replaced with more fitting songs to make them perfect. The first five albums have 10 songs each in my Zeppelin world. In my Zeppelin world Physical Graffiti or shall I say Led Zeppelin VI would be their most progressive. I suggest this because I find the most progressive songs on the album as the best ones. Other look not so exceptional in comparision. Also since I have suggested that all the five albums before this have 10 songs each (more than what they have in the real world), in my alternate Zeppelin world, I would not exactly 7 leftover songs (in fact only of them - You Shook Me, I Can't Quit You Baby, Out On The Tiles, The Battle Of Evermore, Four Sticks, Dancing Days, The Crunge) just like the real Led Zeppelin when they padded 7 leftover songs. But many of these 7 songs are not really progressive. So if I were to make it Zeppelin's ultimate prog effort, this just would not work. So I have a idea. Let this be a single album and let this have every few songs. Only 5 songs in fact! I advocate lengthening of my two favorite songs on the album - the reflective Ten Years Gone and Kashmir to about 10 minutes each. This would leave 25 minutes on the LP that could be filled by the 11 minute In My Time Of Dying and nearly 9 minute In The Light leaving about 5 minutes for my genius idea... including an instrumental version of the funk jam which is led by a theremin. This is my not something which I pulled of my ass; Led Zeppelin did in fact perform an increduble instrumental bridge section of The Crunge loaded with theremin as a segue between Whole Lotta Love and Black Dog on many ocassions. So what does this leave the album with? 5 excellent songs... all sounding very different from each other and all ultra-progressive! This would be Led Zeppelin's first prog attempt, but one of the best prog attempts by anybody! In fact I have a genius idea for what should be the next (and last album) for Zeppelin in my alternate Zeppelin universe. I would have their last album to be another prog album with just 5 songs. There should release only 7 albums - all of them PERFECT. This would leave us with 60 released songs (10 of them instrumentals) on 7 studio albums. I would want them to release a live album in 1976 (to reduce the big gap between 1974 and 1978) and to replace the not so good live album The Song Remains The Same. This live would have 10 extra songs not released on studio albums. Thus Zeppelin would have released 70 songs from 8 albums with 20 songs unrleased (5 songs from Physical Graffiti, Presence, In Through The Out Door and Coda each). These 20 songs could serve as bonus tracks later compilations post Bonham's death.

Zee PROS UND Zee HOES...
Pros - This being the only double Zeppelin album, is one of their most versatile as it pretty much covers whatever Led Zeppelin were doing throughout their career. Unlike most double album which are tedious and feature one too many songs, this album has only 15 songs, several of which are well constructed epics. The band was still at its prime and the leftovers they chose for this album are too good to be leftovers.

Hoes - Side 4 in particular does not make a huge impact as it does not have any epics like the other three sides. Some of the songs especially the plain hard rockers are a bit bland compared to the best songs which are more progressive. They could have made the album more flavorful by selecting the songs I have highlighted above. Plant's voice has also deteriorated with this album and does not have the same range as Houses Of The Holy or albums before it.


Zee CHANGES...
In - None Out - See above Shorten - None Lengthen - Kashmir, Ten Years Gone Change - None

Zee GERMANS...
In my rather futile, worthless and utterly preposterous atempt to all link things good with Zee Germans, I found that the only thing German about this album is their masterpiece song In The Light which has a droning intro which reminds us of drone oriented songs in German made albums like Cluster 1 (Cluster), Zeit (Tangerine Dream), Ash Ra Tempel (Ash Ra Tempel) and Faust IV (Faust)

 

 

 

 

 
 
 

 

 

 

 

 

MASTERPIECE #7 TALES FROM TOPOGRAPHIC OCEANS (1974) YES 20/28 = 71.42%
1
The Revealing Science Of God (22:22) üüüüüü
2
The Remembering (20:38) üüüü
3
The Ancient (18:35) üüüü
4
Ritual (21:37) üüüüüü
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Jon Anderson - lead vocals
Steve Howe
- electric and acoustic guitar, backing vocals
Chris Squire
- electric bass guitar, backing vocals
Rick Wakeman
- organ, piano
Alan White
- drums, percussion

 

 

 

 

MASTERPIECE #3 LIVE AT WEMBLEY (Live - November 16, 1974 in London) PINK FLOYD
1
Shine On You Crazy Diamond (20:21)
2
Sheep (5:10)
3
Dogs (6:08)
4
Speak To Me (2:47)
5
Breathe (2:15)
6
On The Run (5:09)
7
Time (6:33)
8
The Great Gig In The Sky (6:51)
9
Money (8:42)
10
Us And Them (8:11)
11
Any Colour You Like (8:11)
11
Brain Damage (3:45)
11
Eclipse (2:20)
11
Echoes (26:02)
 
 

 

MASTERPIECE #5 WISH YOU WERE HERE (1975) PINK FLOYD
1
Shine On You Crazy Diamond - Parts I to V (13:38)
2
Welcome To The Machine (7:30)
3
Have A Cigar (5:24)
4
Wish You Were Here (5:17)
5
Shine On You Crazy Diamond - Parts VI to IX (12:29)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
MASTERPIECE #7 THE WALL (1979) PINK FLOYD
1
In The Flesh? (3:16)
2
The Thin Ice (2:27)
3
Another Brick In The Wall - Part 1 (3:21)
4
The Happiest Days Of Our Lives (1:46)
5
Another Back In The Wall - Part 2 (3:59)
6
Mother (5:32)
7
Goodbye Blue Sky (2:45)
8
Empty Spaces (2:10)
9
Young Lust (3:25)
10
One Of My Turns (3:41)
11
Don't Leave Me Now (4:08)
12
Another Brick In The Wall - Part 3 (1:48)
13
Goodbye Cruel World (0:48)
14
Hey You (4:40)
15
Is There Anybody Out Here? (2:44)
16
Nobody Home (3:26)
17
Vera (1:35)
18
Bring The Boys Back Home (1:21)
19
Comfortably Numb (6:23)
20
The Show Must Go On (1:36)
21
In The Flesh (4:15)
22
Run Like Hell (4:20)
23
Waiting For The Worms (4:04)
24
Stop (0:39)
25
The Trial (5:13)
26
Outside The Wall (1:41)

 

 

 

MASTERPIECE #2 ZEIT (1972) TANGERINE DREAM
1
Birth Of Liquid Plejades (19:54)
2
Nebulous Dawn (17:56)
3
Origin Of Supernatural Probabilities (19:34)
4
Zeit (16:58)
5
Electric Funeral (4:53)
6
Hand Of Doom (7:08)
7
Rat Salad (2:30)
8
Fairies Wear Boots (6:15)
 

Peter Baumann - organ, piano, synthesizer, flute
Christopher Franke - synthesizer
Edgar Froese
- mellotron, electric guitar, electric bass guitar, synthesizer, organ

Zee Legacy...
.... Zee Sound...
....

Zee Songs...
... Regardless a score of 9.93 out of 10 and a rank of 6th is not a bad show by any means.

Zee PROS UND Zee HOES...
Pros - ...

Hoes - ...

MASTERPIECE #3 RUBYCON (1975) TANGERINE DREAM
1
Rubycon (34:53)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

MASTERPIECE #3 EGE BAMYASI (1972) CAN
1
Pinch (9:28)
2
Swin Swan Song (4:49)
3
One More Night (5:35)
4
Vitamin C (3:34)
5
Soup (10:25)
6
I'm So Green (3:03)
7
Spoon (3:03)
 
 
MASTERPIECE #4 MONSTER MOVIE (1969) CAN
1
Father Cannot Yell (7:06)
2
Mary Mary So Contrary (6:21)
3
Outside My Door (4:11)
4
You Doo Right (20:27)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 
 
MASTERPIECE #3 TRANS-EUROPE EXPRESS (1976) KRAFTWERK
1
Europe Endless (9:40)
2
The Hall Of Mirrors (7:56)
3
Showroom Dummies (6:15)
4
Trans-Europe Express (6:37)
5
Metal On Metal (2:12)
6
Abzug (4:55)
7
Franz Shubert (4:26)
8
Endless Endles (0:55)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

 

 
 
 
 
MASTERPIECE #1 MADE IN JAPAN (Live - 15 and 16 January, 1972 in Osaka and 17 January, 1972 in Tokyo) DEEP PURPLE
1
Highway Star (6:43)
2
Child In Time (12:17)
3
Smoke On The Water (7:36)
4
The Mule (9:28)
5
Strange Kind Of Woman (9:52)
6
Lazy (10:27)
7
Space Truckin (19:54)
8
Black Night (6:17)
9
Speed King (7:25)
10
Lucille (8:03)
 
 
MASTERPIECE #2 MACHINE HEAD (1971) DEEP PURPLE
1
Highway Star (6:05)
2
May Be I'm A Leo (4:51)
3
Pictures Of Home (5:03)
4
Never Before (3:56)
5
Smoke On The Water (5:40)
6
Lazy (7:19)
7
Space Truckin (4:31)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
MASTERPIECE #1 BLACK SABBATH (1969) BLACK SABBATH
1
Black Sabbath (6:20)
2
The Wizard (4:24)
3
Behind The Wall Of Sleep (3:37)
4
N.I.B. (6:08)
5
Evil Woman (3:25)
6
Sleeping Village (3:46)
7
Warning (10:28)
 
 

Geezer Butler - electric bass guitar
Tony Iommi - electric guitar
Ozzy Osborne
- harmonica, lead vocals
Bill Ward
- drums

Zee Legacy...
LOL, those evil bastards. They released this album on February 13th, 1970. Black Sabbath scared the bejeesus out of people back then. They don't usually scare me as much usually but this has some some scary shit and is probably the only metal album which will ever scare me. Look at the cover for fuck's sake. The scariest song on the album is Black Sabbath the self titled song on the self titled album. The way it begins with those creepy bells, thunderstown and rainfall sounds - it just gives me the creeps. This album is highly respected and Black Sabbath has the highest respect among metal fans moreso than both Led Zeppelin and Deep Purple. This album is usually considered their second or third best (after Paranoid and/or Master of Reality, their second and third albums). It is a quintessential heavy metal release and brought Satanism and horror into rock. Zee Sound...
This is not much heavier than the first two Led Zeppelin albums which heavily influenced the band those days. But this is scary and gothic, which Led Zeppelin albums were only to a very small extent. This is amplified blues taken to a Satanic level of extremity. The sound is dominated by heavy and distorted bass and guitar solos by both Butler and Iommi. They were the important guys of the band. Ozzy has demented sounding vocals which are technically not the best but suite Sabbath very well. And Bill Ward is a good drummer but not in the league of say Bonham and Bruford when it comes to thunderous drumming. Nevertheless his tribal drumming suits Black Sabbath very well. Technically Sabbath is inferior to both Led Zeppelin and Deep Purple. Their style also became quite predictable latter on. What makes them a great band is their unlimited supply of memorable riffs and solos. And their ability to music which could fully explore the theme of the lyrics of the song. They were a jam band but a smart one. They did not wander off much even in their lengthy songs. They had a knack of holding the listeners attention. This album is a lot more bluesy than their latter albums and feature a lot more solos. This album also does not have any attempt at acoustic material (which I never thought Sabbath were that good at). So it doesn't have weakpoints (except the somewhat poppy cover - Evil Woman which the record company forced on them). This album is also their scariest and sticks to one theme - Satanism, throughtout. One of the reasons, I love this Black Sabbath album the most is its raw live sound. The whole album was recorded in a day and most of the songs were performed live in the studio in one take! WOW! You could consider this a live in the studio album - just like Led Zeppelin and Hawkwind's debut. I think this is slightly better than Paranoid and Master Of Reality and much better than the albums after that.

Zee Songs...

Zee PROS UND Zee HOES...
Pros - Scariest album ever made. I think this Sabbath album the most because of its raw nature (it was pretty much recorded live in studio) and also because it is focused on one topic - warning against Satanism.

Hoes - Evil Woman is a total misfit on the album.

Zee CHANGES...
In - None Out - Evil Woman Shorten - The Warning Lengthen - The Wizard, N.I.B. Change - None

MASTERPIECE #2 PARANOID (1970) BLACK SABBATH
1
War Pigs (7:57)
2
Paranoid (2:53)
3
Planet Caravan (4:32)
4
Iron Man (6:00)
5
Electric Funeral (4:53)
6
Hand Of Doom (7:08)
7
Rat Salad (2:30)
8
Fairies Wear Boots (6:15)
 
 
 
 
 

 

MASTERPIECE #2 H TO HE WHO AM THE ONLY ONE (1970) VAN DER GRAAF GENERATOR
1
Killer (8:24)
2
House With No Door (6:37)
3
The Emperor In His War Room (8:15)
4
Lost (11:17)
5
Pioneers Over C (12:42)
 
 
 
 
 
 


 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

MASTERPIECE #1 LETZTE TAGE-LETZTE NACHTE (1976) POPOL VUH
1
Der Grose Krieger (3:10)
2
Oh, Wie Nah Ist Der Weg Hinab (4:34)
3
Oh, Wie Weit Ist Der Weg Hinaf (4:33)
4
In Deine Hande (3:01)
5
Kyrie (4:34)
6
Haram Dei Raram Dei Haram Dei Ra (1:27)
7
Dort Ist Der Weg (4:33)
8
Letzte Tage-Letzte Nachte (4:33)
 
Florian Fricke - piano
Daniel Fichelscher - guitar, percussion
Renate Knaup - vocals
Djong Yun - vocals
Guest:
Al Gromer - sitar
Ted De Jong - tamboura

MASTERPIECE #2 HOSIANNA MANTRA (1971) POPOL VUH
1
Ah! (4:40)
2
Kyrie (5:23)
3
Hosianna Mantra (10:09)
4
Abschied (3:14)
5
Segnung (6:07)
6
Andacht (0:47)
7
Nicht Hoch Im Himmel (6:18)
8
Andacht (0:48)
 
Robert Eliscu – oboe
Florian Fricke – piano, cembalo
Conny Veit – electric guitar, 12-string guitar
Klaus Wiese – tamboura
Djong Yun – vocals
Guest:
Fritz Sonnleitner – violin
MASTERPIECE #3 IN DEN GARTEN PHARAOS (1971) POPOL VUH
1
In Den Garten Pharaos (17:38)
2
Vuh (19:51)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Betina - cymbals, production
Frank Fiedler - moog synthesizer, mixdown
Florian Fricke - moog synthesizer, organ, electric piano
Holger Trülzsch - African & Turkish percussion

Zee Legacy...
.... Zee Sound...
....

Zee Songs...

Zee PROS UND Zee HOES...
Pros - ...

Hoes - ...

 

 

 

 

 
 
 

 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 

 

Jan Fride - drums
Helmut Hattler - bass
Johannes Pappert
- alto saxophone
Peter Wolfbrandt - guitar, lead vocals


Zee Legacy...
.... Zee Sound...
....

Zee Songs...

Zee PROS UND Zee HOES...
Pros - ...

Hoes - ...

 
 
MASTERPIECE #1 CLUSTER (1971) CLUSTER
1
untitled (15:33)
2
untitled (7:38)
3
untitled (21:17)
 
 
 
 
 
 

Dieter Moebius - organ, electronically treated cello, audio-generator, amplifier
Conrad Plank - electronics, effects, producer
Hans-Joachim Roedelius - organ, Hawaiian guitar, audio-generator, amplifier, helias


Zee Legacy...
This is usually considered one of the best live albums of all time. Many consider this the best Deep Purple album along with Machine Head and Deep Purple In Rock. This captures the band at their peak when they were touring Japan. This was the earliest live metal albums. It set the standard for all live albums to follow. This is the band's peak line up and they are playing their best songs. All the songs are played very tight and there is some good improvisation as well. Zee Sound...
Most of the songs on this album top the studio version. You get the full feel of the band in this live album. I thought Machine Head was excellent and could not topped but this one has more energy in it. This is easily their best albums and has all their best songs. I would have loved if they included the covers Hush and Kentucky Woman which were the best songs the bands earlier lineup had made. This focuses exclusively on the albums with the second line-up. So I guess it is understand. The sound is a mix of hard rock, metal, funk and classical. Deep Purple are not the most diverse sounding bands, but at the top of their game, they were really hard to top. One can say peak Deep Purple rivals Led Zeppelin (and easily beats Black Sabbath) as heavy metal monsters. The only problem with this band was they didn't stay together for too long.

Zee Songs...
I like all the songs which are played at blistering pace, except The Mule which is a drum solo that drags on a bit long. I still like it but clearly not as much as the rest. This makes this album as the first imperfect masterpiece (90% instead of 100% - see above) on the list. I am not a big fan of drum solos. I guess it would work better when you are standing there with the audience. But I am not standing there. I wish they had some other good songs like Pictures Of Home, Fireball or Demon's Eye. Also, some material from Mark 1 line-up would have been nice to. There is not much to complain here. I have rated Space Ritual much higher because the songs are drastically better and also reworked big time than the studio versions. Here it is different but not that different. Also, Space Ritual had a lot more material and sounds postively brain damaged. This is pretty standard metal stuff. But thoroughly enjoyable. If not for The Mule, this album would have been perfect and rated higher as wel. Although Deep Purple In Rock is more thundering than Machine Head and their live album Made In Japan is more high octane, Machine Heads is by far the most memorable. The only minor issue with this album is it is too samey. Because of this the weaker and lesser memorable songs suffer and look like they should have not been there. As the result, I scored those songs significantly lesser and the album on the whole averaged 9.85 out of 10, securing the 18th spot for the album.

Zee PROS UND Zee HOES...
Pros - Usually considered the (among the) best albums ever made. This captures the band at peak. The band is firing on all cylinders and improvising whenever they get a chance to.

Hoes - Couldn't they have replace the drum solo The Mule with Pictures Of Home or Fireball or Demon's Eye? How about some material from the Mark 1 period?

MASTERPIECE #1 LIVE: 1974 (Live - March 23rd, 1974 in Griessen) HARMONIA
1
Schaumberg (10:45)
2
Veteranissimo (17:25)
3
Arabesque (5:20)
4
Holta Polta (15:00)
5
Ueber Ottenstein (9:30)
 
 
 
 
Dieter Moebius – synthesizer, electronic percussion
Hans-Joachim Roedelius – electronic organ, piano
Michael Rother – guitar, electronic percussion, piano, organ

MASTERPIECE #1 LIVE AT CARNEGIE HALL (Live - June 20-22nd, 1975 in New York) RENAISSANCE
1
Prologue (8:10)
2
Ocean Gypsy (7:13)
3
Can You Understand (10:44)
4
Carpet Of The Sun (3:47)
5
Running Hard (10:03)
6
Mother Russia (10:30)
7
Song Of Scheherazade (29:20)
8
Ashes Are Burning (22:59)
 
 
 
Jon Camp - bass, backing vocals, lead vocals
Michael Dunford - acoustic guitars, backing vocals
Annie Haslam - lead vocals
Terence Sullivan - drums, percussion, backing vocals
John Tout - keyboards, backing vocals
Guest:
Tony Cox - orchestral arrangements
MASTERPIECE #1 EMERSON LAKE PALMER (1970) EMERSON ,LAKE AND PALMER
1
The Barbarian (4:27)
2
Take A Pebble (12:32)
3
Knife-Edge (5:04)
4
The Three Fates (7:46)
5
Tank (6:49)
6
Lucky Man (4:36)
 
 
 
 
 
Keith Emerson - piano, clavinet, Pipe organ, Hammond organ, Moog synthesizer
Greg Lake - bass, guitars, vocals
Carl Palmer - drums, percussion
MASTERPIECE #1 SELLING ENGLAND BY THE POUND (1973) GENESIS
1
Dancing With The Moonlit Knight (8:04)
2
I Know What I Like (4:07)
3
Firth Of Fifth (9:35)
4
More Fool Me (3:10)
5
The Battle Of Epping Forest (11:49)
6
After The Ordeal (4:13)
7
The Cinema Show (11:06)
8
Aisle Of Plenty (1:32)
 
 
 
Tony Banks – piano, organ, electric piano, mellotron, synthesizer, backing vocals, twelve-string guitar
Phil Collins
– drums, percussion, backing vocals, lead vocals
Peter Gabriel – lead vocals, flute, percussion, oboe
Steve Hackett – lead guitar, nylon guitar
Mike Rutherford – bass guitar, bass pedals, rhythm guitar, electric sitar, twelve-string guitar, backing vocals
MASTERPIECE #1 LIVE IN LONDON (1972) AMON DUUL II
1
Soap Shop Rock (13:47)
2
She Came Through The Chimney (3:01)
3
Archangels Thunderbird (3:33)
4
Cerberus (4:21)
5
The Return Of Rubezahl (1:41)
6
Eye Shaking King (5:40)
7
Pale Gallery (2:16)
8
Yeti (18:12)
9
Yeti Talks To Yogi (6:18)
10
Sandoz In The Rain (9:00)
Dave Anderson - bass
Chris Karrer - violin, guitar, 12 string guitar, vocals
Renate Knaup - vocals, tambourine
Peter Leopold - drums
Falk Rogner - organ
Christian "Shrat" Thierfeld - bongos, vocals
John Weinzierl - guitar, 12 string guitar, vocals
Guest:
Rainer Bauer
- guitar, vocals
Ulrich Leopold - bass
Thomas Keyserling - flute
MASTERPIECE #1 FAUST IV (1973) FAUST
1
Krautrock (11:48)
2
The Sad Skinhead (2:36)
3
Jennifer (7:13)
4
Just A Second/Picnic On A Frozen River/Deuxime Tab (3:35)
5
Giggy Smile (7:46)
6
Lauft...Heisst Das Es Lauft Oder Es Kommt Bald... Lauft (8:07)
7
It's A Bit Of A Pain (3:08)
 
 
 
Werner "Zappi" Diermaier – drums
Hans Joachim Irmler – organ
Jean-Hervé Péron – bass
Rudolf Sosna – guitar, keyboards
Gunter Wüsthoff – synthesiser, sax
MASTERPIECE #1 NEU! (1971) NEU!
1
Hallogallo (10:07)
2
Sondarangebot (2:36)
3
Weissensee (6:46)
4
I'm Gluck (6:53)
5
Negativland (9:47)
6
Lieber Honig (7:18)
 
 
 
 
Klaus Dinger – Japanese banjo, drums, guitar
Michael Rother – guitar, bass guitar
MASTERPIECE #1 EL PATIO (1974) TRIANA
1
A Farewell To Kings (4:14)
2
Xanadu (11:05)
3
Closer To The Heart (2:54)
4
Cinderella Man (4:20)
5
Madigral (2:35)
6
Cygnus X-1 Book I: The Voyage (10:25)
 
Juan Jose Palacios (drums, percussion)
Eduardo Rodriguez (flamenco guitar)
Jesus De La Rosa (vocals, keyboards)
Guest:
Antonio Perez (electric guitar)
Manolo Rosa (bass)

 

MASTERPIECE #1 666 (1971) APHRODITE'S CHILD
1
The System (0:23)
2
Babylon (2:47)
3
Loud Loud Loud (2:42)
4
The Four Horsemen (5:53)
5
The Lamb (4:34)
6
The Seventh Seal (1:30)
7
Aegian Sea (5:22)
8
Seven Bowls (1:28)
9
The Awakening Beast (1:11)
10
Lament (2:45)
11
The Marching Beast (2:00)
12
The Battle Of The Locusts (0:56)
13
Do It (1:44)
14
Tribulation (0:32)
15
The Beast (2:26)
16
Ofis (0:14)
17
Seven Trumpets (0:45)
18
Altamount (4:33)
19
The Wedding Of The Lamb (3:38)
20
The Capture Of The Beast (2:17)
21
Infinity (5:15)
22
Hic and Hunc (2:55)
23
All The Seats Were Occupied (19:21)
24
Break (2:59)

Vangelis - keyboards, organ, piano, vibraphone, bass, flute, percussions, backing vocals
Demis Roussos - lead vocals, backing vocals, bass, guitar
Lucas Sideras - lead vocals, backing vocals, drum kit, snare drums
Silver Koulouris - guitar, baritone guitar, percussions
Guest:
Harris Halkitis
- bass, tenor saxophone, congas, percussions, drums, snare drums, background vocals
Michel Ripoche - trombone, tenor saxophone
Irene Papas - vocals
John Forst - vocals
Yannis Tsarouchis - vocals
Daniel Koplowitz - vocals
Costas Ferris
- lyrics

 

MASTERPIECE #1 SEA SON (1974) SECRET OYSTER
1
Oysterjungle (2:57)
2
Mind Movie (9:14)
3
Pajamamafia (6:07)
4
Black Mist (3:40)
5
Painforest (5:40)
6
Paella (8:23)
 
 
 
 
 
Claus Bøhling - guitar
Kenneth Knudsen - piano, synthesizer
Jess Stæhr - bass
Ole Streenberg - drums, percussion
Karsten Vogel - soprano saxophone, alto saxophone, organ
Guests:
Erling Christensen - cello
Palle Mikkelborg - trumpet
Hans Nielsen - violin
Bjarne Boie Rasmussen - viola
Kasper Winding - congas, percussion
Finn Ziegler - violin

MASTERPIECE #1 THE VELVET UNDERGROUND AND NICO (1966) THE VELVET UNDERGROUND AND NICO
1
Sunday Morning (2:54)
2
I'm Waiting For The Man (4:39)
3
Femme Fatale (2:38)
4
Venus In Furs (5:12)
5
Run Run Run (4:22)
6
All Tomorrows Parties (6:00)
7
Heroin (7:12)
8
There She Goes Again (2:41)
9
I'll Be Your Mirror (2:14)
10
The Black Angel's Death Song (3:11)
11
European Sun (7:46)
John Cale – electric viola, piano, bass guitar, backing vocals, celesta on "Sunday Morning"
Sterling Morrison – guitar, bass guitar, backing vocals
Nico – vocals
Lou Reed – vocals, guitar, and ostrich guitar
Maureen Tucker – percussion
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

 
 
 

 

 

 

 

MASTERPIECE #1 HEAD HUNTERS (1973) HERBIE HANCOCK
1
Chamaleon (15:41)
2
Watermelon Man (6:29)
3
Sly (10:15)
4
Vein Melter (9:09)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Herbie Hancock - Fender Rhodes electric piano, Hohner D6 clavinet, ARP Odyssey synthesizer, ARP Soloist synthesizer
Paul Jackson - electric bass guitar, marímbula
Bennie Maupin - soprano saxophone, tenor saxophone, saxello, bass clarinet, alto flute
Harvey Mason- drums
Bill Summers
- congas, shekere, balafon, agogô, cabasa, hindewhu, tambourine, log drum, surdo, gankogui, beer bottle


MASTERPIECE #1 ZOMBIE (1976) FELA KUTI
1
Zombie (12:26)
2
Mister Follow Follow (12:58)
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 

Franco Aboddy - electric bass
Nicholas Addo - congas
Tony Allen - drums
Lekan Animashaun - baritone saxophone
Leke Benson - guitar
Henri Kafi - congas
Ogene Kologbo - guitar
Isaac Olaley - maracas
Fela Kuti - vocals, alto & tenor saxophones, piano
Christopher Uwaifor - tenor saxophone
Tunde Williams - trumpet

 
 
MASTERPIECE #1 ODYSSEY (1975) TERJE RYPDAL
1
Darkness Falls (3:33)
2
Midnite (16:45)
3
Adagio (13:16)
4
Better Off Without You (7:37)
5
Over Birkerot (4:48)
6
Fare Well (11:25)
7
Ballade (5:55)
8
Rolling Stone (23:54)
 
 
 
Brynjulf Blix - organ
Svein Christiansen - drums
Sveinung Hovensjo - 6 and 4 string Fender bass
Terje Rypdal - guitar, string ensemble, soprano sax
Tornbjorn Sunde - trombone
 
 

Zee MASTERPIECE LIST

Before I list out the masterpieces, lets talk statistics. 100 artists are represented here. 17 of the artists have multiple masterpieces. All the 17 of them are bands. Led Zeppelin, Yes and Pink Floyd have 7 album each. Tangerine Dream has 3 albums. The rest of the 14 artists have couple albums. Out of the 17 artists, 10 are primarily British (or led by a Brit) and 7 primarily German (or led by a German). If were to rank these 17 bands, the order will be something like this: Led Zeppelin, Yes, Pink Floyd, Tangerine Dream, Caravan, Hawkwind, Can, Dzyan, Fleetwood Mac, Van Der Graaf Generator, Kraftwerk, Between, Popol Vuh, Deep Purple, Black Sabbath, Cluster and King Crimson. 100 of the albums are studio albums. Rest are live, live-in-studio, compilations or cover albums. Most of the large countries by area are represented on the list. The two largest countries which missed out are in fact the largest two countries (by land are) - Russia and China. Both the countries were communist for most of the 1965-1997 period. So it is understandeable that they didn't make it. 100 of the 133 (that is about 75%) albums were exclusively recorded between 1965-77, my favorite period for music. 70 of the 100 artists are bands. Of the 30 solo artists, 10 (in light pink) had backing bands; the rest were exclusively solo who either recorded solo or used several sessions musicians.